July 16th-18th 2019 – Reddish charm part 2

It’s back!

🌶The Shana B’agina calendar is more than Just a Calendar-  it’s also a monthly guide for home gardening and foraging in nature in rhythm with the seasonal agriculture and local surroundings. A new month begins, and with it the changes in the field and forest, in the garden and nutrition.

Each page of the calendar offers an abundance of illustrated information:🍉

  • Professional tips for your home garden
  • Seeding and planting times
  • Growing plants from seeds to produce
  • Seasonal recipes and food conservation
  • Introducing the wonderful world of bees
  • A QR scan code on each page offers expanded information
  • Moon and sun times and specific “green” dates.

🍅

What else?

  • Environment-friendly printing: ecologic paper and print colors.
  • Calendar measurements (when open): 34X45cm
  • Vegan-friendly

One calendar: 75 NIS | Two calendars: 140 NIS | Three calendars: 210 NIS | Five calendars: 340 NIS | Eight calendars: 540 NIS | Ten calendars: 650 NIS

Order via our order system under “Chubeza vegetables and fruits”

🌿 

Wishing you a year of growth!

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Important Message:

Due to next Sunday being the fast of Tisha’ B’Av, we will prepare the paperwork for our Monday delivery on Thursday night. For this reason, our order system for Monday, July 23rd deliveries will close by this Thursday (July 19th) at 9:00 PM. Please make any orders or instructions by then. Thank you!

For those of you fasting, may it be easy and meaningful, and may we know only happiness and good tidings.

_______________________________

Red All Over – Our Tomatoes, Part II

In last week’s newsletter, we regaled you with the historical and geographical journeys of the tomato. This week, we will focus on our very own tomatoes growing in Chubeza’s fields.

Naturally, tomatoes have been with our farm from the very first year. The tomato’s centrality in the Israeli kitchen, the Israeli salad and garden made it a “must” in our weekly boxes. However, we soon discovered that what is taken for granted in the kitchen does not always come about so easily in the field.

Our first year, we grew tomatoes of various shapes and colors. We had the familiar round tomato and attempted growing traditional types, like the Brandywine tomato – a huge flattened tomato, soft and very sweet, in red and yellow. This is a unique tomato I met in California, but after one season we realized that Brandywine is just not practical for a weekly appearance in boxes in Israel. True, they grew bountifully on the bushes, but chances were slim indeed that a soft tomato would survive in your vegetable box without reaching your kitchen bruised and injured.

So we disposed of our romantic notions and realized we needed to choose a more sensible tomato… Over the years we tried growing elongated tomatoes, big flattened tomatoes and round cluster tomatoes. We grew them on bushes and on vines, large tomatoes and diminutive cherry tomatoes, but we made sure to pick the types that’ll be firm and delicious all the way from the field to your salads.

Most of the years at Chubeza, we grew our crops, tomatoes included, solely in open fields. The first years were somewhat reasonable, but from year to year the ravages of the field increased. We sometimes painfully reminisce about the years we planted so many tomato bushes that yielded so few tomatoes. In the open field, the tomatoes suffered from leaf diseases and other calamities, specifically the tomato yellow leaf curl virus that brought along the tobacco whitefly – a serial tomato terminator. Moreover, since growing tomatoes in an open field is only possible during summertime, we had to purchase tomatoes over the rest of the year from organic hothouse growers to add to your boxes.

But six years ago, we set our eyes on an abandoned hothouse located near our fields, and decided to renovate it and attempt to grow our own vegetables there. The renovations and rehabilitation process was long, demanding much sweat of the brow to prepare the structure for organic growing. After many hard months, it stood ready for the challenge, and we set out with throbbing hearts to plant our first tomatoes. Because of the great difficulty in growing tomatoes (and cucumbers) in an open field, their “must include” status in your boxes made them the first pioneers to receive the comfort and protection of the hothouse net. And so it was.

Growing vegetables in a hothouse is very different from the open field. Though the open field leaves our crops much more exposed to injury, we know we can rely on the natural balances existing there in the great outdoors. Yet as soon as the vegetables are planted in a covered structure, disconnected from the environment, we are the ones responsible for maintaining the balance, restoring it when it goes awry, providing pollination, natural enemies, nutrition and fertilization precise for each specific need, etc. This was a new and significant challenge, and even now, several years later, we still encounter trials and tribulations and we are constantly learning. On the other hand, the dense mesh net that covers the crops does supply important, crucial protection for tomatoes and cucumbers (and the peppers that later joined them).

Still, almost every year we make a stab at growing some beds in the open fields during the early planting season. Sometimes it works, while other times – this year for example – not so well… This year we tried to grow Hanit and Tamar tomatoes in the open field, good sustainable types we know and count on, but the unstable spring weather was not in our favor… The heatwaves in the beginning were destructive, and our open field beds were afflicted by powdery mildew which struck the leaves and ultimately dried them till they withered. There was no yield of these tomatoes whatsoever this year, unfortunately.

Meanwhile, back in the growth tunnels and hothouses, we are currently growing the big tomatoes (Tory and Brono), cluster tomatoes named olympiacos and ikram, and the Ornela. In the little cherry tomato department, we grow the round tival and the elongated candy-sweet lobelo. Big and small tomatoes are grown the same way, with the main difference being narrower bushes for the cherry tomatoes, facilitating their being planted with smaller spaces in between.

The tomato is a tough plant which demands nourishment from fertile soil rich in earthly resources, particularly potassium, in order to joyfully spring forth and create a happy green bush. Lack of potassium creates a soft, powdery tomato. Since potassium is not our soil’s strongest trait, we provide a potassium additive prior to the tomato crop’s growth, followed by melting potassium into the irrigation system once they’re developing. The tomato bushes growing in our hothouses are the “climbing” type. That is, they don’t do the climbing themselves like grapevines, cucumbers or peas, but rather are very long and tall bushes which require trellising – a support for their length so they do not crawl on the earth. Our method of trellising is called “Dutch trellising” in which we tie a “climbing rope” from the roof of the structure for the plant to wind itself around, remaining erect and growing upward. We prune the bushes to keep them upright by removing the side stems, leaving only one central stem which thickens, strengthens and continues to grow upward. When the plant becomes too tall for us to reach, we release a bit of rope rappelling-style in order to bend the head of the bush and allow it some more growing space. (The lower part of the plant, which does not bear fruit at this stage, takes some time off to rest …)

The bushes are treated like pampered babies: in wintertime, we spread plastic on the roof and walls to protect them from the cold, and during summertime it’s a mesh net preventing overheating and warding off pests. We spread a shade net above their heads to lower the temperature and prevent heatstroke. And since we locked them up in the castle like princesses, we bring in the suitors – beehive after beehive is invited into the structures, buzzing with residents who joyfully pollinate the plants.

But even well-maintained castles are sometimes infiltrated by varmits. Though the dreaded tobacco whitefly stayed out, the cheeky Tuta Absoluta moth can manage to creep into the growth tunnels, nibble away at the leaves, leaving only the epidermis like a sheer curtain, and weaken the plant in the process by damaging the photosynthesis receptors. In addition, the Tuta moth stings the fruit, leaving a tiny black entry point – the mark of a dark tunnel dug into the tomato.

        

How do we prevent this catastrophic scenario? First and foremost, we make every effort to keep the growth house and its surrounding as clean as possible. Prior to a new challenging growth, we try to grow a round of Brassicaceaes, which provide natural disinfection together with stability and balance. As soon as we spot moth damage, we attempt to collect the infested leaves and distance them from the growth house, while laying traps for the males via a pheromone trap: plates containing pheromones and water. The males are attracted to the pheromone and are trapped in the water. The traps are beneficial in reducing the moth presence and controlling the number of moths in the tunnel. Biologic pest control is based on toxins produced from various bacterium (Bacillus thuringiensis Var. Kurstaki או Saccharopolyspora spinosa) which work on the larva’s nerve system. It’s a complex challenge but we’re not alone in facing it, which is why so many brains are trying to arrive at a creative solution. We look forward to one day announcing that a solution has been found for controlling this pest (till the next one comes along….).

So there you have it: the chubby rosy-faced tomato goes through a lot from the moment it is planted in the fertile specially-prepared soil till it arrives at its red fullness ready for harvest: it’s protected, cultivated, tied up to stand erect, fertilized, watered, and caressed by sunrays. It is sought after by charming bees, attacked by ruthless, cunning moths, while unruffled, it continues to patiently crawl its way to the sweet ripeness you meet in your boxes.

I would say the tomato deserves one great big round of applause, wouldn’t you?

May we enjoy a peaceful and pleasant week with lots and lots of sunshine, water and happy family time,

Alon, Bat Ami, Dror, Yochai and the Chubeza team

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WHAT’S IN THIS WEEK’S BOXES?

Monday: Bell peppers, slice of pumpkin/butternut squash, parsley/coriander, cucumbers, eggplant/garlic, tomatoes, Thai yard-long beans/okra/zucchini, corn, cherry tomatoes, Amoro pumpkin/acorn squash, New Zealand spinach/Swiss chard.

Large box, in addition: Onions, melon/ potatoes, lettuce.

FRUIT BOXES: Grapes, mango, banana, pears.

Wednesday: Bell peppers, slice of pumpkin/butternut squash, parsley/coriander, cucumbers, eggplant/potatoes, garlic/onions, tomatoes, corn, cherry tomatoes, Amoro pumpkin/acorn squash, , lettuce.

Large box, in addition: Thai yard-long beans/okra, zucchini/melon, New Zealand spinach/Swiss chard.

FRUIT BOXES: Grapes, mango, pears. Small boxes: banana, Large boxes: apples.

 

July 9th-11th – Reddish charm

A reminder: we would appreciate your returning empty Chubeza cartons, as we recycle them for further use. Please leave them for the delivery person when he drops off your boxes (just slice the tape and flatten the carton for easy storage).

Thank you!

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In tribute to those who are serious about baking even in the scorching summer heat, Minhat Haaretz is offering a summer discount on spelt flour (whole or 70%) and teff flour. You get a free bag for every two you buy (2+1).

Run straight to our order system to take advantage of these great  Triple sales!

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Agvaniyaaaaaaaaah

Writing about the old-time community service jingle for eggplants in last week’s newsletter reminded me (and stuck in my head all week long) of its parallel song in praise of juicy tomatoes. Remember it?

The Tomatooooooooo
Fresh or cooked, you’re always hooked,
Absorbing iron quick as can be –
“I’m full of vitamin C,
To cure a cold,
just take me!”

The tomato proudly resides in your boxes all year long, but in summertime it’s in full glory and flavor. Sometimes its banality makes us take the tomato for granted, and in fact some time has passed since we last discussed it. So this newsletter and the next will be devoted to this fruit of love.

IMG_0170

Let’s start with the family tree: the tomato belongs to the selenium family, along with fellow family members the eggplants, peppers, potatoes and… tobacco. Of course, there are many others in the extended family, including wild and cultivated ornamental plants totaling over 2,800 different species. The tomato is a tropical plant originating in Central America. The world’s first tomatoes probably grew in today’s Peru and Ecuador, where they were cultivated before migrating to Mexico to be raised by the Aztecs, who gave them the name tomatel. The habitants of America raised the tomato and realized its value. The Spanish were impressed by its beauty and brought it to Europe in the 16th century. Tomatoes of those times were yellow, thus the origin of its name pomodora – a golden apple in Italian, which became pomo dei Mori – the apple of the Moors, a name later corrupted by the French to become pomme d’amour – the apple of love. The Arabic name bandora probably derives from the Italian name. We will discuss the Hebrew name soon.

When the tomato was first brought to Europe, it was raised only as an ornamental plant. The women of 16th century haute couture adorned their hair with tomato blossoms for special occasions. Yet health experts of the time warned against the fruit, which they considered toxic. The golden tomato may have been forgotten, if not for two 18th century Italian priests who brought the red variety from South America to grow in their yard. Here, in southern Italy, red tomatoes met their first great success among the peasants. Thanks to their courage and willingness to try out many new vegetables that the aristocracy shied away from, we enjoy great vegetables today. The first mention in writing of tomato sauce was a recommendation by a Neapolitan abbot in 1778 for using this as a sauce for meat and fish (not yet pasta or pizza). However, the 19th century firmly belonged to the tomato: by then it was discovered worldwide – including via its the immigration to our country, with a little help from some French monks.

It is hard to imagine a kitchen without tomatoes, specifically the Mediterranean kitchen with its shakshukas’chug, Italian pasta and pizza sauces, as well as being an essential for Spanish, Provence, Greece and Turkey sea and land foods. It’s hard to believe that history mounted the tomato atop European tables only 200 years ago, and that it was completely unknown in the Western world before Columbus made his grand discovery… Even so, the tomato was not so warmly received at its initial debut, and an aura of controversy surrounds it till today. Reading about the tomato, you can find mention that it is lofty and exalted, healthy, essential and important, or that it is poisonous, harmful and even dangerous. So… where are we? Are we poisoning you with tomatoes every week, or saving your souls? Alas, the story of the tomato is neither black nor white. (It is, of course, red, yellow, purple, pink, green…)

tamuz - tomatoes

As mentioned, the tomato belongs to the selenium family. Some of the plants in this family are in fact poisonous and pose a health danger. This poison is due to alkaloids that exist in different parts of the plant. Alkaloids are organic compounds of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen, usually plant-based in origin. They are considered to have an influence on the function of nerves, muscles and the digestive system. The problematic alkaloid in the selenium family is the solanium, which gave it its name, and exists in various levels in family members. The solanium content in edible selenium plants is minute, and is reduced by 40-50% with cooking, which is why most of us can consume it without any problem. And yet, macrobiotic nutrition is very wary of the selenium family, which is considered most problematic when the vegetables are green (green tomatoes, green peppers, etc.) or raw.

On the other hand, tomatoes contain lycopene, the pigment that gives them (as well as watermelons) their red color, considered to be a hue that piques appetite and desire. Lycopene is a very potent antioxidant. Scientists claim that it is one of the “predators” of free radicals which are very active in nature (free radicals are the harmful substances that accelerate the processes of aging and disease). Lycopene is beneficial in battling various types of cancer, particularly prostate, lung and pancreatic cancer. Together with other components of the tomato, it also reduces the danger of heart disease and stroke. Lycopene’s ability to act as an antioxidant also contributes to the healthy function of eyes, to brain cognition and protection against harmful sunrays. The tomato is rich in Vitamin C, which protects against heart disease, stroke, cancer and probably cataracts and complications of diabetes.

Yehiel Mikhal Pines, who worked with Eliezer Ben-Yehuda to revive the spoken Hebrew language, translated Liebesapfel (love apple) from the German to agvaniah, from the root ע.ג.ב- “to love, desire.” The Ben-Yehuda household was not particularly pleased with the immodest agvaniah title, and thus suggested the name badura, Hebraizing the Arabic bandura. Rav Kook preferred a “pure and clean” Hebrew name for the vegetable. Prompted by the red color of the tomato, the venerable rabbi suggested admonia as an alternative. Over various decades, the agvaniah and badura co-existed, each with its own fan club. In the end, love and desire won out, and agvaniah it was.

Most of the tomatoes we know are indeed red, but the full picture shows a colorful, wide, rich range of varieties. In most agricultural farms, a slim variety of tomatoes are grown, but there are organizations and individuals who work to uphold the heritage of the multitude of varieties of tomatoes (as well as other plants and vegetables). See this Mandala from the French Kokopelli Foundation website (thank you, Yiftah, for the link):

mandala-tomatoes

Tune in next week as we resume the journey of the tomato, focusing on it vicissitudes in our field, from the first days in the open field up to the challenging (albeit rewarding) growth over the past few years in protected growth structures. In the meantime, during these prolific weeks of ripe red riches, we will be regaling you with this yummy delight, including both cherry tomatoes and regular tomatoes! Take a look at our recipes for preserving tomatoes: drying them, making sauces, and even tomato jam.

Bon appetite!

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We extend our deep condolences to Mohammed, Mohammadia, Majdi and Ali, on the passing of Mohammadia’s mother, Mohammed’s mother-in-law and Majdi and Ali’s grandmother. May her memory be blessed, and may the entire family be comforted in this sad time.

Wishing you all a good week,

Alon, Bat Ami, Dror, Yochai and the Chubeza team

 

WHAT’S IN THIS WEEK’S BOXES?

Monday: Zucchini/bell peppers, slice of pumpkin/butternut squash, lettuce, cucumbers, tomatoes, potatoes, corn, Thai yard-long beans/cherry tomatoes/green beans, watermelon/Amoro pumpkin, New Zealand spinach. Small boxes only: onions/eggplant.

Large box, in addition: Onions and eggplant, parsley, acorn squash.

FRUIT BOXES: Banana, mango, grapes. Small box only: apples. Large box: plums

Wednesday: Slice of pumpkin/Amoro pumpkin, lettuce, cucumbers, tomatoes, potatoes, corn, cherry tomatoes, New Zealand spinach, acorn squash/butternut squash, onions, carrots/eggplant.

Large box, in addition: Zucchini/bell peppers, Thai yard-long beans/green beans/garlic/okra, parsley.

FRUIT BOXES: Banana, mango, plum, pear

 

Aley Chubeza #298, July 18th-20th 2016

meshek 42In honor of summer and the abundance of dairy products it brings, Puah and Oded of Meshek 42 in Tal Shachar are expanding their product selection to offer two new cheeses for your palate – Tzfati and Pecorino.

Those who are not yet acquainted with Puah and Oded or visited their charming farm are welcome to visit their FB page, but by all means, go pay them an actual visit. Thursdays from 4 PM, Meshek 42 opens its pens to introduce you to their goats. At the same time, you can purchase dairy products, honey, olive oil and additional outstanding products from other farms. We heartily recommend it!

As for the cheeses, here’s Puah discussing the newcomers:

Tzfati Cheese – Fresh and refreshing, semi-hard, and produced from our goats’ milk. Other ingredients include: our homemade yogurt, vegetable-based cheese making enzymes, and coarse salt. Estimated fat content: 12-13%. Date of production appears on the label. Lasts approximately 4 days.

We prepare the cheese one day before delivery and pack it on the morning you receive it. Each 250-gram package costs 28 NIS.

Pecorino-Style Hard Cheese – Originally produced from ewe’s milk, but we make it from our very own goat’s milk. Over the process of production, we add our homemade yogurt, and vegetable and salt-based cheese making enzymes. Estimated fat content is 20-30%, depending on the aging period. Our pecorino is aged 3-12 months, with the aging period indicated on the package. Each 250-gram package costs 48 NIS.

Order via our order system

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tamir-dvash-wildflowersTamir from the Golan Heights has renewed Chubeza’s honey stock, and you may now order 1.5 kg jars from his excellent wildflower honey. Tamir, a fourth-generation Ethiopian beekeeper, raises his bees in small apiaries with hives dispersed throughout the Golan Heights. Thus, the bees get their nectar from a broad range of lovely flowers.

The honey is presently fresh and therefore in liquid form. And, because it is not heated or processed in any way, the honey tends to solidify over time (especially when the weather gets cold). Sweet, healthy, and high quality!

Order via our order system

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What’s Round, Juicy and Red All Over?

Over the past week, we have been experiencing a flood of tomatoes. Our bushes are yielding up a storm of these sweet red ‘uns. Another one of those summer surprises, and a great one at that!

Here at Chubeza we grow tomatoes in various ways: in the open field, on low bushes covered by black nets for shade, trellised and covered as well by a dense shade net (cherry tomatoes), and even in tunnels (tomato bushes) stretched on a string, trellising high. The tunnel, too, is covered with a net, but well-ventilated so the tomato does not suffer a heat stroke. To salute these wonders, now ripening in large quantities, we dedicate this week’s Newsletter.

IMG_0170

Let’s start with the family tree: the tomato belongs to the selenium family, along with fellow family members the eggplants, peppers, potatoes and… tobacco. Of course, there are many others in the extended family, including wild and cultivated ornamental plants totaling over 2,800 different species. The tomato is a tropical plant originating in Central America. The world’s first tomatoes probably grew in today’s Peru and Ecuador, where they were cultivated before migrating to Mexico to be raised by the Aztecs, who gave them the name tomatel. The habitants of America raised the tomato and realized its value. The Spanish were impressed by its beauty and brought it to Europe in the 16th century. Tomatoes of those times were yellow, thus the origin of the name pomodora– a golden apple in Italian, which became pomo dei Mori– the apple of love. The Arabic name bandora probably derives from the Italian name. We will discuss the Hebrew name soon.

In the beginning, when the tomato was first brought to Europe, it was raised only as an ornamental plant. The women of 16th century haute couture adorned their hair with tomato flowers for special occasions. Yet health experts of the time warned against the fruit, which they considered toxic. The golden tomato may have been forgotten, if not for two 18th century Italian priests who brought the red variety from South America to grow in their yard. Here, in southern Italy, red tomatoes met their first great success among the peasants. (The more I write about vegetables, the more I realize that the peasants were the wisest of them all, ready and willing to try out many new vegetables.  Thanks to them, we enjoy great vegetables today.) The first tomato sauce mentioned in writing was in 1778 by a Neapolitan abbot who recommended it as a sauce for meat and fish (not yet pasta or pizza). The 19th century belongs to the tomato: it was discovered worldwide and also immigrated to our country, with the help of French monks.

It is hard to imagine a kitchen without tomatoes, specifically the Mediterranean kitchen with its shakshukas’chug, Italian pasta and pizza sauces, as well as being essential for Spanish, Province, Greece and Turkey sea and land foods. It’s hard to believe that history mounted the tomato atop European tables only 200 years ago, and that it was completely unknown in the Western world before Columbus made his grand discovery…Even so, the tomato was not so warmly received at its initial debut, and an aura of controversy surrounds it till today. Reading about the tomato, you can find mention that it is lofty and exalted, healthy, essential and important, or that it is poisonous, harmful and even dangerous. So… where are we? Are we poisoning you with tomatoes every week, or saving your souls? Alas, the story of the tomato is neither black nor white. (It is, of course, red.)

tamuz - tomatoes

So, the tomato belongs to the selenium family. Some of the plants in this family are in fact poisonous and pose a health danger. This poison is due to alkaloids that exist in different parts of the plant. Alkaloids are organic compounds of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen, the source of which is usually in plants. They are considered to have an influence on the function of nerves, muscles and the digestive system. The problematic alkaloid in the selenium family is the solanium, which gave it its name, and exists in various levels in family members. The quantity of solanium in edible selenium plants is minute, and is reduced by 40-50% with cooking, which is why most of us can consume it without any problem. And yet, macrobiotic nutrition is very cautious of the selenium family, which is considered most problematic when the vegetables are green (green tomatoes, green peppers, etc.) or raw.

On the other hand, tomatoes contain lycopene, the pigment that gives them (as well as watermelons) their red color, considered to be a color that induces appetite and desire. Lycopene is a very strong antioxidant. Scientists claim that it is one of the “predators” of free radicals which are very active in nature (free radicals are the harmful substances that accelerate the processes of aging and disease). Lycopene is beneficial in battling various types of cancer, particularly cancer of the prostate, lungs and pancreas. Together with other components of the tomato, it also lessens the danger of heart disease and stroke. Lycopene’s ability to act as an antioxidant also contributes to the health of eyes, brain cognition and protection against sun damage. The tomato is rich in vitamin C, which protects against heart disease, stroke, cancer and probably cataract and complications of diabetes.

It was the red color that prompted Rav Kook to suggest a “pure and clean” Hebrew name for the vegetable: admonia, in an attempt to find an alternative to the name suggested by Yechiel Michel Pines, who worked with Eliezer Ben Yehuda. He had suggested translating Liebesapfel (love apple) from the German to agvaniah, from the root ע.ג.ב- “to love, desire.” Ben Yehuda, too, was not particularly pleased with the immodest title, and suggested the name badura, Hebraizing the Arabic bandura. Over various decades, the agvaniah and badura co-existed, each with its own fan club, when in the end, love and desire won out, and agvaniah it was.

Most of the tomatoes we know are indeed red, but the full picture shows a colorful, wide, rich range of varieties. In most agricultural farms, a slim variety of tomatoes are grown, but there are organizations and people who work to uphold the heritage of the many varieties of tomatoes (as well as other plants and vegetables). See this Mandala from the French Kokopelli Foundation website (thank you, Yiftah, for the link):

mandala-tomatoes

In Israel, the tomato suffers from certain maladies for which remedies have not yet been found. First and foremost, it is attacked by the yellow leaf curl virus, which is transferred by tobacco moth aphids and destroys the plants at their peak. The disease dries up the plant, preventing it from growing and bearing fruit. In an open area like ours, this is a real problem. Originally, tomatoes are annual plants, and in places free of disease, some tomato plants can grow and produce fruit for more than a year. This is also one of the main reasons that most of the tomato growth in the country (as is common across the globe) takes place in closed areas, enabling farmers to protect the plant from disease. Thus over the past few years here at Chubeza, we have developed growing structures (a hothouse and tunnels) where we raise most of our tomatoes, learning from year to year how to improve. So far, so good (touch wood….).

During these prolific weeks of red riches, we will be regaling you with this yummy delight, expanding quantities in your boxes, and sometimes even sending cherry tomatoes and regular tomatoes at the same time! We recommend you take a look at our recipes for preserving tomatoes: drying them, making sauces, and even tomato jam. Bon appetite!

Enjoy a great summer week,

Alon, Bat Ami, Dror, Yochai and the Chubeza team

___________________________________

WHAT’S JOINING THE TOMATOES IN THIS WEEK’S BOXES?

Monday: Lettuce, parsley/coriander, tomatoes, cucumbers, cherry tomatoes, eggplant, melon, New Zealand spinach/Swiss chard, corn, onions. Small boxes only: sweet red peppers.

Large box, in addition: Thai lubia/okra/zucchini, leeks/scallions, nana mint, slice of pumpkin/butternut squash.

 Wednesday: Lettuce, parsley/dill, tomatoes, cucumbers, cherry tomatoes, eggplant, melon/sweet red peppers, New Zealand spinach/Swiss chard, onions, slice of pumpkin/butternut squash. Small boxes only: corn.

Large box, in addition: hai lubia/okra/, leeks/scallions, nana mint/basil, zucchini/ Amoro pumpkin/spaghetti squash.

And there’s more! You can add to your basket a wide, delectable range of additional products from fine small producers: flour, fruits, honey, dates, almonds, garbanzo beans, crackers, probiotic foods, dried fruits and leathers, olive oil, bakery products and goat dairy too! You can learn more about each producer on the Chubeza website. On our order system there’s a detailed listing of the products and their cost, you can make an order online now!