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Chubeza

Organic vegetables at your doorstep

January 23-25 2023 –  Carrots, anyone?

What meets the eye as we stroll by the carrot bed is only its bad-hair-day and the edge of its scalp. But when we tug it out of the soil – voila! Orange joy retrieved from the dark underworld…
Winter is its season. The carrot does not appreciate warm weather, but adores the cold. It can even grow under a blanket of snow. Now that the weather has cooled off at last, the carrot has finally become a frequent guest in our field and your boxes. We seed several carrot beds every few weeks, and after several months pull out bed after bed of juicy orange corkscrew roots, week after week.

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Nice to meet you - Our Winter greens

Tatsoi
A native of the Far East, member of the Brassicaceae dynasty. Its flavor is just slightly bitter, not spicy, but very distinctive. Excellent when served with piquant flavors (mustard and black pepper), ginger, sesame and sweet fruits.
Swiss Chard
A sibling of the beet, but growing huge leaves instead of a thick root. Perfect in soup, quiches, and stuffing, as well as steamed or tossed, and even tossed fresh in a salad.
Curly Kale
A green belonging to the Brassicaceae family, considered to be one of the healthiest foods around. Kale is usually cooked or added to a green shake, but you can make chips from it or eat fresh in a salad—-it’s great!
Red Russian Kale
A green belonging to the Brassicaceae family, considered to be one of the healthiest foods around. Kale is usually cooked or added to a green shake, but you can make chips from it or eat fresh in a salad—-it’s great!
Arugula
Goes by many names: arugula, rucola, roquette and rocket lettuce. Its flavor is piquant, typical of the Brassicaceae family. Add a dash to a salad, even together with sweet fruit. Cheeses go quite well with arugula, and a very light cooking can temper the spiciness.
Spinach
just slightly bitter and then just a little sweet, chockful of rain and freshness flavors. Like its cousin Swiss chard, spinach can be served fresh in a salad or can be cooked, added to soup, a quiche, dumplings, an omelet or warm salads. They all work.
New Zealand Spinach
Its origins are in New Zealand and Australia. Ideal for our local climate, thanks to its penchant for warm weather. Sporting small and meaty leaves. Can be used in any recipe calling for spinach or Swiss chard. To prepare for cooking, remove the leaves from the stem which is hard and inedible. It is not recommended raw.