November 11th-13th 2019 – Once upon a long time span…

All in the Family

This week we greet with gusto the amazing Broccoli, the last representative of the prominent Brasiccae family (“kings of winter”) to join your vegetable boxes this season. This diverse family runs the gamut of preferences and developments in plants: leaves, flower buds, and thickened stems. They all need fertile and fertilized earth, and in return they provide us with a heaping portion of health, nutrition and flavor. Not to mention beauty: take the cauliflower for example, with it shining white crown, or a purple or green rain-dotted head of cabbage, or Brussel sprouts which seem to be crawling up the stem to reach the top. This stunning pluralistic diversity is heartwarming – look at this family accepting each and every variation and tendency, manner of development, characteristic colors and precise flavor.

Granted, this branched-out developing took some time, during which each member of the family found the right rhythm to beat to. This happened mainly thanks to the curiosity and self-confidence of loyal farmers, during times when everything was much slower and patience was abundant (what other choice did they have?). Changes and developments were achieved by hard work and sweat of the brow, which perhaps led to a fuller, more significant satisfaction with the positive results.

Today’s pace of change and discovery is much swifter than it once was, but even in the distant, primitive past, farmers constantly refined their crops. Actually, many of the most amazing changes in species development came not as a result of structured research, but rather out of the simple act of a farmer choosing and collecting seeds from the plants s/he favored over seeds from less-desired plants. This straightforward action of promoting one plant over another had a profound effect on the improvement and change of a specific harvest or species. Long before wo/man understood the genetics of plants, their actions brought about small, slow variations in the crops, which compounded over time until they generated visible results.

The Brassicaceae family (or “cabbage family”) is a perfect example. All family members derive from one wild plant, the brassica oleracea, which originated in the Mediterranean area and resembles the canola in appearance. At some point after the plant was cultivated, people began growing it for its leaves. Since they consumed the leaves, it made sense to choose the plants that produced the largest leaves. As a result, those leaves became bigger and bigger, eventually creating the plant we now know as kale or collard. Kale’s botanical name is var. acephala, translating to “a headless cabbage.”

Others preferred plants that produced small, denser and more delicate leaves in the center of the plant at the head of the stem, hence advancing plants with those characteristics. Over the seasons, the process of compacting became more and more prominent in those plants, as they yielded a heap of dense, closed leaves on their heads. Over the years, it grew and evolved into a real “head of leaves” which we call cabbage, whose actual title is var. capitata, meaning “a cabbage with a head.”

Around the same time in today’s Germany, farmers preferred short, thick-stemmed kale. They ate the actual stem, and gradually, by choosing plants with a tendency for thick stems, the former cabbage began to alter its greatly-thickened stem. This turned into kohlrabi, which earned the name var. caulorapa, meaning “a stem turnip.”

Over the past thousand years, wo/man also developed a passion for the undeveloped flower buds of the cabbage and chose the plants that produced large-bloom heads. This is how we got cauliflower and broccoli, both different variations of an undeveloped cabbage plant. Cauliflower is var. botrytis, meaning “cluster,” for its resemblance to a cluster of grapes. Broccoli, which was developed in Italy, earned the title var. italica

And, as for the last member of this extended family: we each have our own individual taste, and apparently there were those (most probably the Belgians) who preferred plants that developed an assemblage of dense leaves along the stems. They chose and re-chose plants that produced this sort of leaf shape, and thus brought the world Brussels sprouts, titled var. germmifera “the cabbage with gems.”

In summary, this long, winding familial tale demonstrates that without a systematic education in genetics or plant propagation, but via a simple process of seed selection and a lot of patience, more than six distinctive vegetables have developed over the past 7000 years. Small, everyday miracles. They happen in the best of families.

May this week bring wonder, diversity, determination and faith that despite this very strange November weather we will soon be blessed with abundant rains.

Wishing the entire diverse family of Israel and it’s neighbors peaceful times,

Alon, Bat Ami, Dror, Orin, Yochai and the Chubeza team

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WHAT’S IN THIS WEEK’S BOXES, ALONG WITH THE CABBAGE FAMILY?

Monday: Swiss chard/New Zealand spinach/kale/tatsoi, Lubia Thai yard-long beans/Iraqi lubia/Jerusalem artichoke, sweet potatoes, eggplant/red bell peppers, cucumbers, tomatoes, cauliflower/broccoli, carrots, parsley/coriander/dill, lettuce/mizuna/arugula. Small boxes only: Baby radishes/daikon.

Large box, in addition: Cabbage/beets, scallions/celery, fennel/turnips, pumpkin/okra.

FRUIT BOXES: Avocados, bananas, oranges/clementina, pomelit, kiwi.

Wednesday: Swiss chard/New Zealand spinach/kale/tatsoi, Lubia Thai yard-long beans/Iraqi lubia/Jerusalem artichoke/okra, sweet potatoes, eggplant/red bell peppers, cucumbers, tomatoes, cauliflower/broccoli, carrots, parsley/coriander/dill, lettuce/mizuna/arugula. Small boxes only: Baby radishes/daikon/turnips.

Large box, in addition: Cabbage/beets, scallions/celery, fennel/kohlrabi, slice of pumpkin.

FRUIT BOXES: Avocados, bananas/apples, clementina, kiwi.

April 8th-10th 2019 – A Family Matter

No deliveries on Chol Hamoed, so you will not be receiving your vegetables on Monday, April 22 and Wednesday, April 24. But… if the vegetables don’t come to you, you can come to them!

On Wednesday, April 24, don’t miss our traditional Pesach Open Day in the field between 2pm-6pm. Stay tuned for more details!

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Many of the excellent products available through our Order System to be added to your boxes are Kosher for Pesach, including: honey, olive oil, spices, dates, tahi-na, date honey, gluten-free crackers and even some of Dani and Galit’s cookies. Contact us for further details.

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All-of-a-Kind Family

After this blessedly abundant winter (which is most probably not over yet….), the whole world is blooming around us. However busy you may be these days, it’s worth taking advantage of any small break from your chores to step outside, breathe in all of the amazing “green” that abounds, and take in the remarkable blossoming that covers our surroundings. This is also the very short time of year when two members of the Cistus (commonly known as Rockrose) family bloom at the same time: the Sage-Leaved Rockrose with its smooth white blossom and early rising, and the Soft-Hairy Rockrose blooming in a wrinkled pink flower several weeks after its brother. I love the legend about the two Rockrose brothers being invited to a party. The Sage-Leaved Rockrose shaved, got dressed and arrived promptly at the party, while his less time-efficient Soft-Hairy brother threw on his clothes in such a rush that he slid into the party wearing a very wrinkled shirt. When he caught sight of his well-groomed brother, he blushed in shame…

When I tell my daughters this story, I usually end it by saying: this is what family is all about. Composed of people who are different from one another, each with his or her own way to live their lives and with their own unique perspectives. And hey, there’s room for everyone! In the family I come from, similar to the family I have raised with my partner, we each have very different opinions and traits, preferences and choices (including politics, of course). Obviously, this diversity is not always simple and demands patience and flexibility (specifically during elections….) but that’s the general idea – always keep your door and heart open to family.

Throughout this lavish winter, we have enjoyed many a visit from many a member of Chubeza’s winter royalty: the Brasiccae’s. This diverse family runs the gamut of preferences and developments in plants: leaves, flower buds, and thickened stems. They all need fertile and fertilized earth, and in return they provide us with a heaping portion of health, nutrition and flavor. Not to mention beauty: take the cauliflower for example, with it shining white crown, or a purple or green rain-dotted head of cabbage, or Brussel sprouts which seem to be crawling up the stem to reach the top. This stunning pluralistic diversity is heartwarming – look at this family accepting each and every variation and tendency, manner of development, characteristic colors and precise flavor. With Pesach celebrations upon us as we gather with our own varied family members, the Brasiccae family is worth a thought or two.

Granted, this branched-out developing took some time, during which each member of the family found the right rhythm to beat to. This happened mainly thanks to the curiosity and self-confidence of loyal farmers, during times when everything was much slower and patience was abundant (what other choice did they have?). Changes and developments were achieved by hard work and sweat of the brow, which perhaps led to a fuller, more significant satisfaction with the positive results.

Today’s pace of change and discovery is much swifter than it once was, but even in the distant, primitive past, farmers constantly refined their crops. Actually, many of the most amazing changes in species development came not as a result of structured research, but rather out of the simple act of a farmer choosing and collecting seeds from the plants s/he favored over seeds from less-desired plants. This straightforward action of promoting one plant over another had a huge effect on the improvement and change of a specific harvest or species. Long before wo/man understood the genetics of plants, their actions brought about small, slow variations in the crops, which compounded over time until they generated visible results.

The Brassicaceae family (or “cabbage family”) is a perfect example. All family members derive from one wild plant, the brassica oleracea, which originated in the Mediterranean area and resembles the canola in appearance. At some point after the plant was cultivated, people began growing it for its leaves. Since they consumed the leaves, it made sense to choose the plants that produced the largest leaves. As a result, those leaves became bigger and bigger, eventually creating the plant we now know as kale or collard. Kale’s botanical name is var. acephala, translating to “a headless cabbage.”

Others preferred plants that produced small, denser and more delicate leaves in the center of the plant at the head of the stem, hence advancing plants with those characteristics. Over the seasons, the process of compacting became more and more prominent in those plants. Over the years, it grew and evolved into a real “head of leaves” which we call cabbage, whose actual title is var. capitata, meaning “a cabbage with a head.”

Around the same time in today’s Germany, farmers preferred short, thick-stemmed kale. They ate the actual stem, and gradually, by choosing plants with a tendency for thick stems, the former cabbage began to alter its greatly-thickened stem. This turned into kohlrabi, which earned the name var. caulorapa, meaning “a stem turnip.”

Over the past thousand years, wo/man also developed a passion for the undeveloped flower buds of the cabbage, and chose the plants that produced large-bloom heads. This is how we got cauliflower and broccoli, both different variations of an undeveloped cabbage plant. Cauliflower is var. botrytis, meaning “cluster,” for its resemblance to a cluster of grapes. Broccoli, which was developed in Italy, earned the title var. italica.

And, as for the last member of this extended family: we each have our own personal tastes, and apparently there were those (most probably the Belgians) who preferred plants that developed an assemblage of dense leaves along the stems. They chose and re-chose plants that produced this sort of leaf shape, and thus brought the world Brussels sprouts, titled var. germmifera “the cabbage with gems.”

In summary, this long, winding familial tale demonstrates that without a systematic education in genetics or plant propagation, but via a simple process of seed selection and a lot of patience, more than six distinctive vegetables have developed over the past 7000 years. Small, everyday miracles. They happen in the best of families. 

One last thing – a great tip from Jerusalemite Michal to the extended Chubeza family. Here it is in her words and photos:

I buy fresh garlic from Mahmud in Machane Yehuda, and he recommended I grind the green garlic leaves in a food processor with a metal blade, after removing the external and harder leaves. Add fresh lemon juice and a generous amount of olive oil. You can then freeze the mixture in small cubes or containers and defrost when desired. It’s perfect for cooking or baking fish and can be used with meat as a chimichurri-like spread.

Wishing us all a week of respect and concern for all members of Israeli society, in all their wonder and diversity.

Shavua Tov!

Alon, Bat Ami, Dror, Yochai and the Chubeza team

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WHAT’S IN THIS WEEK’S BOXES?

Monday: Beets/baby radishes, green garlic/leeks, lettuce, potatoes, cucumbers, tomatoes, cauliflower, kale/Swiss chard/chubeza (mallow)greens, parsley root/celeriac, fresh fava beans/peas, parsley/coriander/dill.

Large box, in addition:  Zucchini/turnips, cabbage/fennel/kohlrabi, carrots

FRUIT BOXES: Bananas, avocadoes, Clementinot, apples.

Wednesday: Beets, green garlic/leeks, potatoes, cucumbers, tomatoes, cauliflower, kale/Swiss chard/chubeza (mallow)greens, parsley root/celeriac, carrots, fresh fava beans, parsley/coriander/lettuce.

Large box, in addition:  Zucchini/peppers, cabbage/fennel/kohlrabi, turnip/baby radishes

FRUIT BOXES: Bananas, avocadoes, Clementinot, apples.

March 11th-13th 2019 – Cabbage Joy

V’nahofocho

Next week we will be creating delivery havoc for some of you. Due to the Fast of Esther which falls on Wednesday, 20.3, the delivery schedules will be as follows:

Wednesday, March 20th Tel Aviv, Herzlia and Gush Etzion: Deliveries as usual.

Jerusalem: Ein Kerem, Kiryat Hayovel, Beit Hakerem, Rehavia, Nachlaot, Kiryat Moshe, Malcha, Katamonim and Katamon, Bak’a, Talbiye, Talpiyot and Armon Ha’Natziv  – Deliveries will be brought up one day earlier, Tuesday, March 19th.

Beit Choron, Ramot, French Hill, Giva’t Hamivtar, Abu Tor, central Jerusalem, Gilo and parts of Bak’a and Talpiyot – deliveries as usual, Wednesday, March 20th.

We hope you take this change in the spirit of the merry holiday. To clarify which day you will be receiving your delivery, if needed, please contact us.

Chag Sameach!

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Love is Like a Cabbage

My love is like a cabbage
Divided into two,
The leaves I give to others,
The heart I give to you.

The photos were taken by Chana, and just how beautiful are they?!

Wintertime marks a zenith for the amiable Brassicaceae family that grows in our field. This week we dedicate our newsletter to the “ancient” member of the bunch– the cabbage. You’ve been enjoying his visits for so long that some of you have begun treating him like a guest who forgot to leave… So, to remind you how much you should love and appreciate the humble cabbage, this newsletter is his.

The original wild cabbage originated in the Mediterranean coastal region, Southern Europe and Southern England, where it enjoyed humid weather. This primeval cabbage must have been very different from the cabbage we know today, probably a stem with few open leaves. Cabbage belongs to the very prominent Brassicaceae family which includes cauliflower, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, kohlrabi, kale, collards and the oriental leafy vegetables bok choy, tatsoi, mustard, Chinese cabbage and many others.

The Brassicaceae’s belong to the Cruciferae family, named for the shape of their flowers, whose four petals resemble a cross. Research indicates that vegetables from the Brassicaceae can fight breast cancer, abdominal and intestinal cancer, thanks to phytochemicals containing the indole compound. Cabbage juice is known as a remedy for ulcers, and folk remedies use cabbage leaves to bandage and calm swollen or infectious patches of the body, like post-birth breast engorgement. Cabbage is rich in iron, calcium and potassium, and contains high levels of vitamins B, C and D. Red cabbage contains higher levels of iron, calcium and potassium, as well as vitamin C and dietary fibers. This nutritional abundance makes it a very efficient bone strengthener, immune system fighter, respiratory disease defender, and skin irritation mender. On the other hand, over-consumption of cabbage may adversely affect the thyroid gland.

Read more about the nutritional benefits of lettuce here.

Pickling cabbage is a great way to keep it un-refrigerated for a long period of time as well as preserving its vitamins. Captain Cook used to ascribe his seamen’s excellent health to a daily serving of pickled cabbage.

In Northern Europe, cabbage was one of the only vegetables to grow in the frozen winter, which is why the snowy-day menu included a wide variety of cabbage dishes. This was the fare of every common Russian eater as well, which included sour cabbage soup, rye bread and a nasty drink. Pickled cabbage was brought to Poland and Hungary by Turkish vagabonds in the 16th and 17th centuries, and a common German 18thcentury meal usually included cabbage, sausages, lentils and rye bread. In the Scandinavian region, the winter menu was comprised of foods which could be preserved by smoking, drying or salting—all perfect for cabbage. In China, they would dry the cabbage leaves and store them for winter, then wet and revive them to add to soup or some other dish. The Chinese, too, served pickled cabbage as a side dish at mealtime.

     

Throughout history, the cabbage has known many ups and downs. The Greeks loved it for its medicinal attributes, but medieval aristocracy turned up its nose at the mere mention of the vegetable: In Medieval Europe, vegetables, particularly leafy vegetables, were considered harmful to your health, as they produce “wind” (gas), which was unthinkable in aristocratic circles. But still, the people continued to eat cabbage (and a good thing they did!)

If you were to heed a Roman scholar from the 2nd century BC, you’d eat lots of fresh cabbage seasoned in vinegar if you intend to imbibe. The Egyptians suggested beginning your meal with fresh cabbage, including its seeds, in order to remain sober till the end of the meal. Seems like the common cure for hangovers was the consumption of more and more cabbage. The East Europeans and Turks stuff it, the Chinese add it to stir-fries, the Ethiopians cook it spicy, and the Japanese serve it pickled as an appetizer. In Germany, cabbage is a national food, in a sweet-and-sour slow-cooked dish of red and white cabbage, and in Scandinavia, the ultimate appetizer is coleslaw (whose name derives from the Dutch for cabbage “kool” and salad “sla”).

In 1984, the cabbage was finally granted its due when the UN Food and Agricultural Organization declared it one of the 20 most important foods in world nutrition.

Check out our variety of cabbage recipes in our recipe section on our website.

Like the rest of its siblings, the cabbage leaf has a unique texture, allowing it to repel the rain showered upon it in wintertime, so that the leaf does not wear thin and rot from over-saturation. In order for the water to reach the roots and quench their thirst, the face of the leaf has a waxy, water-repellent texture, thus the raindrops are not absorbed but rather drip-drop gracefully into the earth

       

“Cabbages are quite an amazing feat of nature. Cabbages plants produce normal-looking leaves for quite some time before reaching a threshold,” writes Farmer John in his cookbook (Farmer John’s Cookbook: The Real Dirt on Vegetables). Then, as if they are attuned to an inner biological clock, “they suddenly start curling in,” producing a loose ball, which then proceeds to “[layer] one leaf on top of the other,” pushing the round head from the inside “until they create a tight sphere.” (Farmer John’s Cookbook: The Real Dirt on Vegetables) It is truly amazing and I’m surprised each time it happens, when the flat leaves curl in roll up into a ball – just like last time.

    

Wishing us all wonders and a pleasant week of sunshine and rain,

Alon, Bat Ami, Dror, Yochai and the entire Chubeza crew

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WHAT’S IN THIS WEEK’S BOXES?

Monday: Snow peas or garden peas, leeks/onions, broccoli/cauliflower, potatoes, cucumbers, tomatoes, bell peppers/carrots, lettuce, cabbage, fresh fava beans, kale/chubeza (mallow)greens/broccoli greens.

Large box, in addition: Kohlrabi/beets/fennel, parsley/coriander, parsley root/celeriac.

FRUIT BOXES: Bananas, pomelit, clementinot, oranges, pink grapefruit.

Wednesday: Snow peas or garden peas, onions, cabbage/broccoli/cauliflower, potatoes, cucumbers, tomatoes, carrots, kohlrabi/beets/bell peppers, lettuce, fresh fava beans, parsley/coriander.

Large box, in addition: Kale/chubeza (mallow)greens/broccoli greens, parsley root/celeriac, leeks.

FRUIT BOXES: Bananas, pomelit, clementinot, melons, pink grapefruit.

December 18th-20th 2017 – Once upon a long time span…

Iddo, our baker par excellence, has patiently and professionally developed a new gluten-free sourdough bread! This new guy on the (bread) block has aced great scores in top-level taste tests, a tribute to Iddo’s talents and his determination to reach the highest standards in product creation.

The new bread uses green buckwheat culture, millet and tapioca as its base, and contains teff flour, organic tapioca flour, organic green buckwheat flour, organic olive oil, salt, a trace sugar, yeast and xanthan gum.

Don’t wait! Add this super-bread today for delivery via our order system.

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The “Minhat Ha’aretz” flour grinders, firm believers in baking your own products for winter, hereby offer a very special deal for the next month. Over Tevet (beginning this week through the middle of January,) all local flours (whose seeds are grown in Israel) will be on sale, including: organic wheat flour, organic corn flour, organic chickpea and teff.

The discounted prices are updated in our order system. Enjoy your baking fiesta!

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All of a Kind Family

Now and over the upcoming weeks, it’s time to happily greet many members of Chubeza’s winter royalty: the Brasiccae’s. This diverse family runs the gamut of preferences and developments in plants: leaves, flower buds, and thickened stems. They all need fertile and fertilized earth, and in return they provide us with a heaping portion of health, nutrition and flavor. Not to mention beauty: take the cauliflower for example, with it shining white crown, or a purple or green rain-dotted head of cabbage, or Brussel sprouts which seem to be crawling up the stem to reach the top. This stunning pluralistic diversity is heartwarming – look at this family accepting each and every variation and tendency, manner of development, characteristic colors and precise flavor. With Hanukah celebrations upon us as we gather with our own varied family members, the Brasiccae family is worth a thought or two.

 

Granted, this branched-out developing took some time, during which each member of the family found the right rhythm to beat to. This happened mainly thanks to the curiosity and self-confidence of loyal farmers, during times when everything was much slower and patience was abundant (what other choice did they have?). Changes and developments were achieved by hard work and sweat of the brow, which perhaps led to a fuller, more significant satisfaction with the positive results.

Today’s pace of change and discovery is much speedier than it once was, but even in the distant, primitive past, farmers constantly refined their crops. Actually, many of the most amazing changes in species development came not as a result of structured research, but rather out of the simple act of a farmer choosing and collecting seeds from the plants s/he favored over seeds from less-desired plants. This straightforward action of promoting one plant over another had a huge effect on the improvement and change of a specific harvest or species. Long before wo/man understood the genetics of plants, their actions brought about small, slow variations in the crops, which compounded over time until they generated visible results.

The Brassicaceae family (or “cabbage family”) is a perfect example. All family members derive from one wild plant, the brassica oleracea, which originated in the Mediterranean area and resembles the canola in appearance. At some point after the plant was cultivated, people began growing it for its leaves. Since they consumed the leaves, it made sense to choose the plants that produced the largest leaves. As a result, those leaves became bigger and bigger, eventually creating the plant we now know as kale or collard. Kale’s botanical name is var. acephala, translating to “a headless cabbage.”

Others preferred plants that produced small, denser and more delicate leaves in the center of the plant at the head of the stem, hence advancing plants with those characteristics. Over the seasons, the process of compacting became more and more prominent in those plants. Over the years, it grew and evolved into a real “head of leaves” which we call cabbage, whose actual title is var. capitata, meaning “a cabbage with a head.”

Around the same time in today’s Germany, farmers preferred short, thick-stemmed kale. They ate the actual stem, and gradually, by choosing plants with a tendency for thick stems, the former cabbage began to alter its greatly-thickened stem. This turned into kohlrabi, which earned the name var. caulorapa, meaning “a stem turnip.”

Over the past thousand years, wo/man also developed a passion for the undeveloped flower buds of the cabbage, and chose the plants that produced large-bloom heads. This is how we got cauliflower and broccoli, both different variations of an undeveloped cabbage plant. Cauliflower is var. botrytis, meaning “cluster,” for its resemblance to a cluster of grapes. Broccoli, which was developed in Italy, earned the title var. italica.

And, as for the last member of this extended family: we each have our own individual taste, and apparently there were those (most probably the Belgians) who preferred plants that developed an assemblage of dense leaves along the stems. They chose and re-chose plants that produced this sort of leaf shape, and thus brought the world Brussels sprouts, titled var. germmifera “the cabbage with gems.”

In summary, this long, winding familial tale demonstrates that without a systematic education in genetics or plant propagation, but via a simple process of seed selection and a lot of patience, more than six distinctive vegetables have developed over the past 7000 years. Small, everyday miracles. They happen in the best of families. 

A hearty mazal tov and best wishes for joy and happiness to Dror and Naomi as they greet their newest member of the family, a baby boy and a gift of Hanukah light.

Wishing us all a week of wonder and diversity, of faith, determination and patience.

And may the very near future bring us the blessing of rain!

Alon, Bat Ami, Dror, Yochai and the Chubeza team

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WHAT’S IN THIS WEEK’S BOXES?

Monday: Coriander/dill, lettuce, cucumbers, kale/totsoi, tomatoes, cauliflower, fennel/ baby radishes/daikon, beets, scallions/leeks, broccoli/snow peas, sweet potatoes. Small boxes only: eggplant/ green bell peppers. Special gift for all: arugula/mizuna.

Large box, in addition: Celery/celeriac, Swiss chard/spinach, Jerusalem artichoke/carrots, cabbage.

Wednesday: Coriander/dill, lettuce, cucumbers, kale/spinach, tomatoes, cauliflower/broccoli, fennel/kohlrabi, scallions/leeks, sweet potatoes/cabbage, eggplant/Jerusalem artichoke/carrots, celery/celeriac. Special gift: arugula/mizuna/totsoi.

Large box, in addition: Baby radishes/daikon/turnip, beets, Swiss chard.

And there’s more! You can add to your basket a wide, delectable range of additional products from fine small producers: flour, sprouts, honey, dates, almonds, garbanzo beans, crackers, raw probiotic foods, dried fruits and leathers, olive oil, sourdough breads, gluten free breads, granola, natural juices, cider and jams, apple vinegar, dates silan and healthy fruit snacks, ground coffee, tachini, honey candy, spices and goat dairy too! You can learn more about each producer on the Chubeza website. On our order system there’s a detailed listing of the products and their cost, you can make an order online now!

Aley Chubeza #325, February 6th-8th 2017

shoreshei zionThis week you will find tasty samples of Shoreshei Tzion Raw Veggie Seed Crackers in your boxes.  Hand-prepared, these crackers are made from sprouted seeds & organic veggies dehydrated at low temperatures to preserve their nutrition. They are gluten-free, sugar-free, and made from only the highest quality ingredients.

Choose from 5 delectable cracker flavors, as well as many other amazing products which are available thru our online ordering system. But hurry! For the next 2 weeks, Shoreshei Tzion is offering a special 10% discount! 24 NIS (instead of 27).

לבריאות !

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Fun Friday in the Field – A Weeding Party at Chubeza!

With Tu B’shvat right around the corner, there’s still so much to do… Even though the days are getting longer, we are having trouble keeping up. The weeds in our field are sprouting out all over, loving and lapping up the combination of lots of rain followed by sunny hours.  It’s a true field day for the weeds!

Preparing the field for spring requires lots of work – covering, cleaning out the beds, spreading compost and setting up the irrigation for the new planting – and then come the seeding and planting. All these tasks keep our hands full. But since the long list of chores comes in such perfect timing with great weekend weather, the time has come to throw a Chubeza Weeding Party and invite you to come spend some quality time with us while you lend a helping hand.

This Friday we will happily receive any and all of you who wish to contribute his/her time and energy. In return for your labor, we can reward you with fresh air, green fragrances and organic vegetables straight from the field. A great recipe for some family bonding, couple-livening, fitness improvement and mood boost, as well as providing some time to devote to pondering the meaning of life and other minor issues…

You are cordially invited to join the Chubeza Weeding Party on Friday, February 10, from 9:00-1:00 pm. We thank you in advance, and look forward to welcoming  you to this much-needed event.

Let us know you’re coming: 054-6535980 or csa@chubeza.com so we can plan to receive you in the style to which you’re accustomed…It’s Party Time!!!

Come one, come all. We await your visit! ________________________________________________

Love is Like a Cabbage

My love is like a cabbage
Divided into two,
The leaves I give to others,
The heart I give to you.

(In honor of the upcoming Valentine’s Day)

This time of the year marks the peak for the amiable Brassicaceae family that grows in our field throughout the wintertime: broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and kohlrabi. This week we dedicate our newsletter to the “ancient” member of the bunch– the cabbage. You’ve been enjoying his visits for so long that some of you have begun treating him like a guest who forgot to leave… So, to remind you how much you should love and appreciate him, this newsletter is his.

The photos were taken by Chana, and just how beautiful are they?!

Paris 179

Throughout history, the cabbage has known many ups and downs. The Greeks loved it for its medicinal attributes, but medieval aristocracy turned up its nose at the mere mention of the vegetable. If you were to heed a Roman scholar from the 2nd century BC, you’d eat lots of fresh cabbage seasoned in vinegar if you intend to imbibe. The Egyptians suggested beginning your meal with fresh cabbage, including its seeds, in order to remain sober till the end of the meal. Seems like the common cure for hangovers was the consumption of more and more cabbage.

In Northern Europe, cabbage was one of the only vegetables to grow in the frozen winter, which is why the snowy-day menu included a wide variety of cabbage dishes. This was the fare of every common Russian farmer as well, which included sour cabbage soup, rye bread and a nasty drink. In China, they would dry the cabbage leaves and store them for winter, then wet and revive them to add to soup or some other dish. The Chinese would also serve pickled cabbage as a side dish at mealtime. Pickled cabbage was brought to Poland and Hungary by Turkish vagabonds in the 16th and 17th centuries, and a common German 18thcentury meal usually included cabbage, sausages, lentils and rye bread. In the Scandinavian region, the winter menu was comprised of foods which could be preserved by smoking, drying or salting—all perfect for cabbage. In medieval times, vegetables, and particularly leafy vegetables, were considered harmful to your health, as they produce “wind” (gas), which was unthinkable in aristocratic circles. But still, the people continued to eat cabbage.

In 1984, the cabbage was finally granted its due when the UN Food and Agricultural Organization declared it one of the 20 most important foods in world nutrition.

The East Europeans and Turks stuff it, the Chinese add it to stir-fries, the Ethiopians cook it spicy, and the Japanese serve it pickled as an appetizer. In Germany, cabbage is a national food, in a sweet-and-sour slow-cooked dish of red and white cabbage, and in Scandinavia, the ultimate appetizer is coleslaw (whose name probably derives from the Dutch for cabbage “kool” and salad “sla”). And the list goes on…

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Cabbage belongs to a very prominent family – the Brassicaceae – which includes cauliflower, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, kohlrabi, kale, collards and the oriental leafy vegetables bok choy and tatsoi. The original wild cabbage originated in the Mediterranean coastal region, Southern Europe and Southern England, where it enjoyed humid weather. This primeval cabbage must have been very different from the cabbage we know today, and was probably a stem with few open leaves.

Research indicates that vegetables from the Brassicaceae can fight breast cancer, abdominal and intestinal cancer, thanks to phytochemicals containing the indole compound. On the other hand, over-consumption of cabbage may adversely affect the thyroid gland. Cabbage juice is known as a remedy for ulcers. Cabbage is rich in iron, calcium and potassium, and contains high levels of vitamins B, C and D. Red cabbage contains higher levels of iron, calcium and potassium, as well as vitamin C and dietary fibers. Pickling cabbage is a great way to preserve its vitamin C. Captain Cook used to ascribe his seamen’s excellent health to a daily serving of pickled cabbage.

A few years ago, Ruth, a veteran client from Jerusalem, made a surprising request. She asked me for external white cabbage leaves (the kind which remain in the field after the cabbage heads are harvested) in order to use them for medicinal compresses. When I inquired, she added some recipes and tips for using kitchen ingredients for medicine and health matters, which I’m happy to share with you once more. Before I bring her message, Ruth requested I make sure to stress that this does not replace medical treatment or opinions.

Raw Cabbage Salad:

Keeps all the nutritional value of the cabbage, is rich in calcium, vitamins, minerals.

  • A tip for a natural calcium additive: add a granule of ground eggshell. When it comes in contact with the lemon juice, it becomes acidic calcium, easy to digest and absorb

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Raw Cabbage Juice:

Retains all the nutritional value of the cabbage, minus the fiber, and therefore recommended only for short periods of time.

Use a juicer, and add two stalks of celery and one carrot if desired.

Drink 1-2 cups a day in sips which you hold in your mouth for some time before swallowing, easing digestion and absorption.

Good for:

  • Calcium deficiency
  • Abdominal and intestinal ulcers, sensitivity in the digestive system/mucous membranes (fresh potato juice is good for this too)
  • Arthritis, rheumatism

Cabbage Tea:

You lose some vitamins and consume lots of sugar. Beneficial for upper respiratory tract ailments.

Efficient in treating the common cough, cold, sore throat, runny nose, lung diseases.

Cook 1/2 liter of strained cabbage juice with 3 grams of (real) saffron and 1/4 liter of sugar or honey, till it thickens. Take 1 spoonful 3-4 times a day.

Cooked Cabbage:

You lose some of the vitamins, and it is harder on those sensitive to gassy foods. Burns fat, good for cleansing and for weight reduction.

Pickled Cabbage (homemade, by fermentation):

This is not German sauerkraut, but rather a true health-bomb!

The fermentation (of lactic acid microbes along with the yeast) creates a lactic acid (like all the fermented foods: pickles, miso, yogurt, etc.). Lactic acid protects the natural flora in your intestines as well as healthy mucous membranes, prevents the development of germs, protects natural strength and allows the absorption of food in the intestine. In addition, the vitamins are retained and other important enzymes are created through the process of fermentation.

Here is some additional information about these germs. Eliezer of Shoreshei Zion delivers workshops on how to make pickled fermented vegetables. Contact him for updated information on the next available workshops.

Good for the treatment of:

  • Calcium deficiency
  • Candida
  • Diabetes
  • Vitamin B12 deficiency
  • Blood and digestion cleansing
  • Improving metabolism
  • Anemia (strengthens)
  • Arteriosclerosis
  • Arthritis, rheumatism
  • Cabbage juice relieves a sore throat or vaginal infection (wash externally)
  • Diuretic, toxin secretor (important for cancer patients)
  • Good for your diet (eat 100 grams per day over 4 weeks)

How to prepare:

Use a big glass jar which you can later refrigerate.

  • Thinly slice 5 kg of cabbage
  • Add 100 grams sea salt, kummel (caraway) and one whole allspice.
  • If you wish to use less salt, you will need more seasoning. Use thyme, light mustard seeds (good as preservatives), etc.
  • You may also layer grape leaves, or even add apple slices.
  • For more calcium, add 1/2 cup of ground eggshells, which will provide calcium with lactic acid which absorbs well.
  • Squeeze the cabbage into the jar using your hand or a stick, making sure all is covered by the resulting liquid. You may cover it from above with a cabbage leaf.
  • Place a heavy object (a clean stone, or fill up another jar with water) on the cabbage so that while it ferments, the cabbage is always covered by liquid.
  • Close with a cloth cover, set aside (in the light, not the sun) for about a week.
  • Taste it. When ready, keep refrigerated.
  • If more liquid is needed, boil 1 liter water with 10 grams sea salt, cool, and add.

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Cabbage Leaves (for compresses):

Used in ancient times as a remedy for almost any disease.

You can provide your body with all the attributes of fresh cabbage externally, via your skin, in a separate treatment or together with internal consumption, to double the medicinal effect.

How to Use:

  • Take fresh green leaves (the external cabbage leaves) and wash in lukewarm water to remove the dirt.
  • Cut from the protruding thickness of the spine. Lay on a cutting board and roll a glass bottle over it, to soften the leaf.
  • To warm it: place on the lid of a warm pot, wash under warm water or wet a piece of cloth with warm water and place the leaf over it.
  • Crisscross some leaves over one another upon the required area (forehead, neck, nape, chest, stomach, knee…) and bandage over it with a hot cloth. May apply this compress from 30 minutes up to the entire night. You may refresh the compress every two hours, if needed. If it causes discomfort or pain, leave on for shorter periods of time.
  • Cancer patients may experience more pain in the beginning from this form of therapy, but this will improve in time.
  • At the end of treatment, remove the bandage, wash in lukewarm water and spread on some olive oil (or hypericum- very good for cancer patients).
  • You may alternate between bandaging with cabbage leaves, clay, carrot, cream cheese and more to achieve various effects.
  • If the leaf removed seems dry, it must have given its liquids to the body, and not absorbed any in return.
  • If the leaf is saturated by a bloody fluid which sometimes emits a bad smell, the leaf has drained some fluid from the body. Bodily fluids that were stagnant and rotting are the cause for the foul smell, similar to fluid accumulated in pus.

Health Uses:

(As part of general treatment. Sometimes healing is immediate, sometimes long weeks are required till total recovery, or till the body reaches its healing limit).

  • Cabbage leaves transfer their beneficial materials to the body and absorb the toxins and unhealthy body liquids.
  • Cleanse the blood and lymph system
  • Drain out toxins via urine and skin (in chronic illnesses, skin problems may develop due to the bandaging. This means there are too many toxins and the body is secreting them via the skin, till it heals.)
  • Painkiller
  • Disinfects, drains liquids.

Thank you, Ruth, for your diligence.

In honor of the cabbage, we added many cabbage recipes which you can find in our recipe section on our website.

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Like the rest of its siblings, the cabbage leaf has a unique texture, allowing it to repel the rain showered upon it in wintertime, so that the leaf does not wear thin and rot from over-saturation. In order for the water to reach the roots and quench their thirst, the face of the leaf has a water-repellent texture, thus the raindrops are not absorbed but rather drip-drop gracefully into the earth.

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“Cabbages are quite an amazing feat of nature. Cabbages plants produce normal-looking leaves for quite some time before reaching a threshold, then they suddenly start curling in, layering one leaf on top of the other until they create a tight sphere.” (Farmer John’s Cookbook: The Real Dirt on Vegetables) This may sound like flowery language, but in the field it really is magic. I’m surprised each time it happens, when the flat leaves do what they do and become a ball – just like last time.

Wishing us all a wintery week of magic…

Alon, Bat Ami, Dror, Yochai and the entire Chubeza team

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WHAT’S IN THIS WEEK’S BOXES?

The recent frigid nights took a toll on our peas: frost collected on both the snow peas and the garden peas, leaving tell-tale white spots on the pods upon melting. Yet despite the white-hued pods, the peas inside are still absolutely delicious. These marks are not the result of pest attacks, just a weather casualty. So kindly give those peas-in-a-pod a big smile, and nosh away……………..

Monday: Parsley, lettuce, broccoli greens/kale/spinach, cucumbers, cabbage/red cabbage/cauliflower, broccoli, tomatoes, carrots, snow peas/ fava beans/garden peas,   kohlrabi/white turnips. Special gift: coriander/dill. Small boxes only: celery/celeriac.

Large box, in addition:  Bok choy/arugula/mizuna, beets/potatoes, scallions/leeks, Jerusalem artichokes

Wednesday: cauliflower, lettuce, cucumbers, tomatoes, celery/celeriac/potatoes, parsley/dill, broccoli, kohlrabi/radish, carrots. Small boxes only: arugula/mesclun baby green mix, leeks.

Large box, in addition:  Beets/fennel, Jerusalem artichokes/cherry tomatoes, New Zealand spinach/broccoli, red or green cabbage, fava beans/snow peas.

And there’s more! You can add to your basket a wide, delectable range of additional products from fine small producers: flour, fruits, sprouts, honey, dates, almonds, garbanzo beans, crackers, probiotic foods, dried fruits and leathers, olive oil, bakery products, apple juice, cider and jams, dates silan and healthy snacks and goat dairy too! You can learn more about each producer on the Chubeza website. On our order system there’s a detailed listing of the products and their cost, you can make an order online now!