August 13th-15th 2018 – KING CORN – part I

cornsky

For some time now, your boxes have proudly contained the king of summer, his royal highness The Corn. Every year it accompanies us from June to November, joins us as we bid the schoolyear farewell, enjoys our summer vacation and then goes back to school with us come fall. In essence, the corn crop begins to ripen in June, when the weather turns warm but still has an occasional breezy day, moves headlong into the intolerable heat of July-August and the heatwaves of September, breathes a sigh of relief in October, and makes certain that moderate weather has returned before saying goodbye in November. Now that’s what I call a king!

Corn is probably one of the first crops the Americans learned to grow. Approximately 7,000 years ago, some gleaners (probably Mayan women, or women of a neighboring tribe in Central America) noticed a spontaneous mutant among the weeds, a teosinte, with a cob that was longer and filled with seeds that were larger than your average ancient weed. Something sparked their intuition, and they tasted it – to their great delight. They also discovered that seeds which fell to the ground sprouted and became a mature plant that yielded more cobs. After some time, they learned that if they kept and seeded the better seed varieties, the next crop would be even more improved!

To your left is the olden corn, and to your right is its current cultured form:

At the next stage, they (no longer gleaners, but now also farmers) discovered that if they grow corn, beans and squash, they could actually make a decent basic diet out of them. The plants also grew well together: the corn acted as a supporting pole for the bean to climb upon, and the squash grew on the earth as live mulch, preventing weeds and keeping moisture in.

This threesome, which earned the title “the three sisters,” is an excellent example of the plant guild/community: a group of plants who become valuable when they grow together. The key to their success is the positive reciprocal relationship between them: each plant contributes to its neighbors, and receives from the neighbors in return. And just like human communities, a good plant guild is a more independent entity, stronger, healthier and easier to maintain then growing plants which are not connected to one another. This agricultural development proved to be so time-efficient that it gave the growers enough spare moments to build houses, weave rugs and baskets, develop astronomy and math, and of course – party…

Today, corn is one of the only crops which cannot reproduce without a human helping hand, as it requires the planting of separate seeds in order for the plant to sprout.

In various languages, corn was granted venerable names. The first to bring corn to Europe were the Spanish, who gave it a name from the native Taino: mahis in Taino, maize in Spanish. The meaning in Taino is “the seed that gives life.” The Latin name continued this theme, calling it Zea (life giver) mays.

Only when the wonder vegetable emigrated to Europe did it receive its dull, listless name “corn” that was a generic name for grains (even salt grains, hence “corned beef”), and the derogatory titles “Turkey wheat,” “Turkey/Egyptian corn,” or “Indian corn.” Apparently they were not referring to the origins of the grain, but rather making a social comment that this was an uncultivated, wild, barbaric grain, as compared to “polite” cultured European grains.

The Hebrew name tiras was chosen based on the English “Turkey corn,” or the Yiddish equivalent Tirkishe Veitzen. In an old nature book, The Genesis of Learning, Baruch Linda describes “Turkey wheat” (חטי טורקיא) as “a grain with yellowish round seeds… each plant containing three towers, each tower or stalk containing two hundred and forty adhered seeds.”

So how did the Hebrew tiras derive from the Turkey? The word tiras is mentioned in the Bible in the books of Genesis and Chronicles. Tiras was Jefeth’s seventh son (Noah’s grandson). Scholars identified Tiras as the father of the Turkish nation (Tractate Yoma), which is why the “Turkish” grain was granted this name.

In a letter from 1912, Naomi Shapiro of Kvutzat Kineret described an agricultural summer festival of the day: “We left from Sejera at five AM in six carts with Hebrew and Turkish flags. Nature was impeccably beautiful and thus we arrived in Kineret within two hours, singing and clapping our hands… All sorts of vegetables were displayed from the various farms and moshavot, beans and peas and beets, tiras wheat, pumpkins, squashes, bandoras, cucumbers, grains and wheat – all neatly arranged…” Over the years, the “wheat” was dropped, leaving only the tiras.

Its lackluster name certainly does not reflect the sweet, positive nature of this wonderful grain, upon which the world of South American natives was once so dependent. And perhaps the come-down of the name from “life giving” to “wild grain” somewhat reflects the devaluation of this outstanding plant in the Western world.

Today, too, we are dependent upon corn in every realm, especially food: Almost every processed food contains corn, but corn of a very limited genetically-engineered variety that appears in its processed, worn and abused form, totally bereft of nutritional value, and of course, a product which demands an excessive exertion of energy.

We use corn starch for thickening and gluing, and corn syrup for sweetening. Expansion materials, emulsifiers, food coloring, and citric acid are all are derived from corn, as well as most of the animal fodder in the meat industry. Corn also serves a role in the production of plastic and oil. (If you wish to learn more about corn and food in our world, I highly recommend Michael Pollan’s book, The Omnivore’s Dilemma.)

But for all its many uses, there is nothing like simply sinking your teeth into a fresh ear of corn. There are those who do not trust the Kashrut of corn. They fear that tiny insects lying within the corn silk will find their way into the kernels, becoming impossible to detect and remove.  Dror once told me that he heard from a “Sunfrost” mashgiach (kashruth supervisor) how to deal with this matter. According to him, the bugs run towards the cob when they are exposed to light, as the corn is peeled and its silk removed. The solution is simple and creative: peel the corn in the dark! This way, the bugs remain in the silk and get tossed to the compost. You are more than welcome to try this out at home…

Wishing everyone a great week,

Alon, Bat Ami, Dror, Yochai and the entire Chubeza team

__________________________________________

WHAT’S JOINING THE CORN IN THIS WEEK’S BOXES?

Monday: Bell peppers, slice of pumpkin, Thai yard-long beans, cucumbers, okra/onions, tomatoes, corn, cherry tomatoes, butternut squash, parsley/coriander, New Zealand spinach.

Large box, in addition: Eggplant, scallions, potatoes.

FRUIT BOXES: Pears, nectarines, mango. Small boxes only: Bananas Large box only: Grapes

Wednesday: Bell peppers, slice of pumpkin, Thai yard-long beans/garlic, cucumbers, onions, tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, butternut squash, parsley/coriander, New Zealand spinach, eggplant/potatoes.

Large box, in addition: Okra, corn, scallions.

FRUIT BOXES: Pears, grapes, mango. Small boxes only: Bananas Large box only: plums

King Corn – Part 2! – July 10th-12th 2017

The excellent Iza Pziza dairy in Tal Shachar is pleased to invite you for a visit and activities over the summer. You will meet the goats and kids in the pen, try your hand at your very own cheese-making, and sample all the dairy goodies. What a great activity for a hot summer day!

See more details here.

_______________________________

One last dance before we say goodbye…

After a fruitful collaboration (sometimes a pun is just – well – perfect…) of several years, we will bid farewell to Helaf and Melo Hatene fruit boxes. The last fruit boxes will be delivered Wednesday, July 12th.

You will still be able to purchase Melo Hatene tahini and coffee via our order system.

We wish to thank Helaf, the very devoted head of Melo Hatene, for years of partnership. Melo Hatene is still active, and you are more than welcome to visit and enjoy all its abundance and unique beauty. The diverse farm hosts a fruit orchard, olive press, apiary, as well as locally ground sesame and coffee. A great place to visit and enjoy.

Take a look

_______________________________

King Corn – Part 2!

In every Chubeza corn seeding, we insert two beds (4 rows) of hard wrinkled yellow seeds into the earth. When I say we “insert” them, I mean it, because after many attempts to use a seeder, we realized that the best method is still to do it by hand. We notch furrows in the earth and scatter the seeds at a distance of 10-15 cm apart.  Afterwards, we cover the furrow, water it, and start praying for healthy growth.

After the initial sprouting, the corn grows rapidly, producing tall, strong, erect stalks that you can actually get lost in. At a farm where I worked in California, each year they would plant a huge corn maze where everyone, young and old, would love to get lost in during the October Halloween festival. At Chubeza, a group of kids decided to find out what it feels like to enter the corn bed jungle:

corn4  corn2

corn1   corn3

Since we seed the corn repeatedly within relatively short spans of time, a tour of the field reveals corn beds of varying heights, from 20 cm munchkins, through 50, 80 and 150 cm tall guys, all the way to towering stalks of 2 meters and more! Even the plants that have already been harvested and are currently retired are in no hurry to migrate to Miami, but rather stand there yellowing away in the summer sunshine. (I harbor a special fondness for them…)

IMG_0213

The type of corn Chubeza grows belongs to the “super-sweet” variety (SH2). True to its name, this corn is indeed super and sweet. Who would have believed that such incredibly tasty corn is actually the result of a mutation! And before you ask – I do not mean a genetic-engineered mutation (perish the thought), but rather one which occurred naturally, in the field, far away from sterile labs, and consequently developed by simple hybridization just like any other hybrid seeds. Here’s how this works:

Most of the corn seeded in the world is not even sweet (field/dent corn), but is produced primarily for animal fodder, for cornflower production, and for industrial uses such as ethanol for gas, the plastic industry, corn oil and various other additives. This field corn is actually the ancient corn variety that was grown in Southern and Central America thousands of years ago.

A primary advantage of corn is that it is unstable. It is a crop that is genetically sensitive to mutations and changes that occur in nature, in its genetic composition, which makes it an honored guest within the annals of scientific research (corn plants were instrumental in reaching some of the most important discoveries in genetics, like the Transposons) and a huge variety of corn types – in different colors, shapes and sweetness. Here are some examples:

 Cornvarieties

Sweet corn has been known in Western civilization since 1770. It is not clear when this natural mutation first occurred, but it caused the storing of a double amount of sugar in the storage tissue (endosperm) of the seed. There are hundreds of sweet corn varieties in this group, and it is the common form of fresh corn (on the cob) here in Israel. But this sweetness lives on borrowed time – corn is a cereal crop, and thus from the moment it ripens and is picked off the stalk, an internal process occurs where the sugars turn to starch. During this process, corn loses its sweetness and becomes floury and starchy, thus corn that is eaten more than 3 or 4 days from harvest loses a great deal of its sweetness.

Over the past few decades, two other groups of corn were developed, both based on mutants that occurred naturally which were then carefully developed to create stable varieties for agricultural use. One is the “sugar enhanced” (SE) corn, boasting higher sugar content than traditional sweet corn, which is why when refrigerated it retains sweetness 2-4 days after harvest. The second group is the Super-Sweet corn (SH2), three times sweeter than the other varieties. And most important here, the process of the sugar-transforming-to-starch is much slower, allowing it to remain sweet up to ten days after harvest (when refrigerated). This has, of course, many advantages, specifically when dealing with export to distant markets—but the Chubeza family has the chance to enjoy these nice mutants on the same day they are picked: triply sweet and fresh.

If you cook our corn, this sweet treat blends perfectly with so many flavors: salty, spicy, and sour ingredients all add a distinctive, complementary savor. But really, the best way to enjoy this corn is by simply cooking it in water for a few minutes and then biting right into the fresh cobs. Perhaps it’s too early just yet, but in two months’ time when you may feel the need for a change of pace, take a look at our recipe section for some intriguing non-standard uses for the sweet king of summer.

Here’s to a sweet and summery week, and don’t forget to drink!

Alon, Bat Ami, Yochai, Dror and the entire Chubeza team

____________________________________

WHAT’S IN THIS WEEK’S SUMMER BOXES?

Monday: Parsley, Amoro pumpkin, cherry tomatoes /okra, fakus/cucumbers, zucchini, tomatoes, corn, eggplant, potatoes, melon/water melon. Small boxes only:  leeks/garlic.

Large box, in addition: New Zealand spinach/ lettuce, parsley root, slice of Provence pumpkin/butternut squash, yard-long beans.

Wednesday: Parsley/cilantro, Amoro pumpkin, fakus/cucumbers, zucchini, tomatoes, corn, eggplant, potatoes, melon/water melon. Small boxes: cherry tomatoes/okra/yard-long beans. Small boxes only: New Zealand spinach/ lettuce.

Large box, in addition: Parsley root, slice of Provence pumpkin/butternut squash, leeks/garlic, yard-long beans and cherry tomatoes.

And there’s more! You can add to your basket a wide, delectable range of additional products from fine small producers: flour, sprouts, honey, dates, almonds, garbanzo beans, crackers, probiotic foods, dried fruits and leathers, olive oil, bakery products, apple juice, cider and jams, dates silan and healthy snacks and goat dairy too! You can learn more about each producer on the Chubeza website. On our order system there’s a detailed listing of the products and their cost, you can make an order online now!

July 3rd-5th 2017 – KING CORN – part I

One last dance before we say goodbye…

After a fruitful collaboration (sometimes a pun is just – well – perfect…) of several years, in two weeks we will bid farewell to Helaf and Melo Hatene fruit boxes. The last fruit boxes will be delivered Wednesday, July 12th.

You will still be able to purchase Melo Hatene tahini and coffee via our order system.

We wish to thank Helaf, the very devoted head of Melo Hatene, for years of partnership. Melo Hatene is still active, and you are more than welcome to visit and enjoy all its abundance and unique beauty. The diverse farm hosts a fruit orchard, olive press, apiary, as well as locally ground sesame and coffee. A great place to visit and enjoy.

Take a look

________________________________

cornsky

For two weeks now, your boxes have proudly contained the king of summer, his royal highness the corn. Every year it accompanies us from June to November, joins us as we bid the schoolyear farewell, enjoys our summer vacation and then goes back to school with us, come fall. In essence, the corn crop begins to ripen when the weather turns warm but still has an occasional breezy day, moves headlong into the intolerable heat of July-August and the heatwaves of September, breathes a sigh of relief in October, makes certain that moderate weather has returned, and only then says goodbye in November. Now that’s what I call a king!

This week, American citizens celebrated the independence of their homeland, the Birthplace of Corn, so in everyone’s honor, we shall sing a song of praise to the sweet, yellow cob!

Corn is probably one of the first crops the Americans learned to grow. Approximately 7,000 years ago, some gleaners (probably Mayan women, or women of a neighboring tribe in Central America) noticed a spontaneous mutant among the weeds, a teosinte, with a cob that was longer and filled with seeds that were larger than your average ancient weed. Something sparked their intuition, and they tasted it – to their great delight. They also discovered that seeds which fell to the ground sprouted and became a mature plant that yielded more cobs. After some time, they learned that if they kept the better seeds and planted them, the next crop would be even more improved!

At the next stage, they (no longer gleaners, but now also farmers) discovered that if they grow corn, beans and squash, they could actually make a decent basic diet out of them. The plants also grew well together: the corn acted as a supporting pole for the bean to climb upon, and the squash grew on the earth as live mulch, preventing weeds and keeping moisture in. This proved to be so time-efficient that it gave the people enough spare moments to build houses, weave rugs and baskets, develop astronomy and math, and of course – party…

To your left is the olden corn, and to your right is its current cultured form:

Today, corn is one of the only plants which cannot reproduce without a human helping hand, as it requires the planting of separate seeds in order for the plant to sprout.

In various languages, corn was granted venerable names. The first to bring corn to Europe were the Spanish, and they gave it a name from the native Taino: mahis in Taino, maize in Spanish. The meaning in Taino is “the seed that gives life.” The Latin name continued this theme, calling it Zea (life giver) mays.

Only when the wonder vegetable emigrated to Europe did it receive its dull, listless name “corn” that was a generic name for grains (even salt grains, hence “corned beef”), and the derogatory titles “Turkey wheat,” “Turkey/Egyptian corn,” or “Indian corn.” Apparently they were not referring to the origins of the grain, but rather making a social comment that this was an uncultivated, wild, barbaric grain, as compared to “polite” cultured European grains. The Hebrew name tiras was given based on the English “Turkey corn,” or the Yiddish equivalent Tirkishe Veitzen. In an old nature book, The Genesis of Learning, Baruch Linda describes “Turkey wheat” (חטי טורקיא) as “a grain with yellowish round seeds… each plant containing three towers, each tower or stalk containing two hundred and forty adhered seeds.”

So how did the Hebrew tiras derive from the Turkey? The word tiras is mentioned in the Bible in the books of Genesis and Chronicles. Tiras was Jefeth’s seventh son (Noah’s grandson). Scholars identified Tiras as the father of the Turkish nation (Tractate Yoma), which is why the “Turkish” grain was granted this name.

Naomi Shapiro of Kvutzat Kineret described an agricultural summer festival in a letter from 1912: “We left from Sejera in six carts with Hebrew and Turkish flags at five am. Nature was impeccably beautiful and thus we arrived in Kineret within two hours, singing and clapping our hands… all sorts of vegetables were displayed from the various farms and moshavot, beans and peas and beets, tiras wheat, pumpkins, squashes, bandoras, cucumbers, grains and wheat – all neatly arranged…” Over the years, the “wheat” was dropped, leaving only the tiras.

Its lackluster name certainly does not reflect the sweet, positive nature of this wonderful grain, upon which the world of South American natives was once so dependent. And perhaps the come-down of the name from “life giving” to “wild grain” somewhat reflects the devaluation of this outstanding plant in the Western world.

American natives used corn in various manners: eating it fresh or cooked, drying the cob and grinding it into flour, pounding the fresh grains to produce polenta, a wet corn porridge; decorating the house with colorful strings of corn, fashioning cornhusk dolls, popping it for popcorn, feeding animals the cobs, etc. All parts of the corn had advantages and uses: corn stalks were used in building, fishing, etc.; the corn “beard” was used as a medicinal herb to cure kidney ailments, and the cornhusks were used to weave mats and baskets and create masks, moccasins and dolls.

Today, too, we are dependent upon corn in every realm, especially food: Almost every processed food contains corn, but corn of a very limited genetically-engineered variety that appears in its processed, worn and abused form, totally bereft of nutritional value, and of course, a product which demands an excessive exertion of energy.

We use corn starch for thickening and gluing, and corn syrup for sweetening. Expansion materials, emulsifiers, food coloring, and citric acid are all are derived from corn, as well as most of the animal fodder in the meat industry. Corn also serves a role in the production of plastic and oil. (If you wish to learn more about corn and food in our world, I highly recommend Michael Pollan’s book, The Omnivore’s Dilemma.)

But for all its many uses, there is nothing like simply sinking your teeth into a fresh ear of corn. There are those who do not trust the Kashrut of corn. They fear that tiny insects lying within the corn silk will find their way into the kernels, becoming impossible to detect and remove.  Dror, one of our loyal deliverymen, recently told me that he heard from a “Sunfrost” mashgiach (kashruth supervisor) how to deal with this matter. According to him, the bugs run towards the cob when they are exposed to light, as the corn is peeled and its silk removed. The solution is simple and creative: peel the corn in the dark! This way, the bugs remain in the silk and get tossed to the compost. You are more than welcome to try this out at home…

Wishing us all a great week,

Alon, Bat Ami, Dror, Yochai and the entire Chubeza team

_______________________________________________

WHAT’S COMING ALONG WITH “THE KING” IN THIS WEEK’S BOXES?

Monday: Parsley, Amoro pumpkin, beets/edamame (green soybeans)/yard-long beans, fakus/cucumbers, zucchini, tomatoes, corn, eggplant, potatoes, melon/water melon. Small boxes only:  Parsley root.

Large box, in addition: New Zealand spinach/ lettuce, leeks/garlic, acorn squash/white squash, cherry tomatoes

Wednesday: Parsley, Amoro pumpkin, yard-long beans/cherry tomatoes/okra/acorn squash, fakus/cucumbers, zucchini, tomatoes, corn, eggplant, potatoes, mini watermelon, leeks/parsley root.

Large box in addition: Beets, white squash/slice of Provence pumpkin, New Zealand spinach/lettuce.

And there’s more! You can add to your basket a wide, delectable range of additional products from fine small producers: flour, sprouts, honey, dates, almonds, garbanzo beans, crackers, probiotic foods, dried fruits and leathers, olive oil, bakery products, apple juice, cider and jams, dates silan and healthy snacks and goat dairy too! You can learn more about each producer on the Chubeza website. On our order system there’s a detailed listing of the products and their cost, you can make an order online now!

Aley Chubeza #296, July 4th-6th 2016

jam-a

Music and Camaraderie:

The Chubeza family is invited to a musical jam session and weekly get-together at the Gonenim-Mekor Haim “Book Stop” on the Mesila Park. Here’s your chance to make beautiful music together, smile, and get to know your neighbors. The jam session will be directed by the musicians of “Project Intro,” and each week we will host musicians from various Jewish and Palestinian community centers.

We invite parents and their children, students, grandparents, uncles and aunts to join the celebration. Bring your musical instruments and get ready to play!

5 PM – 6 PM: Arts & crafts activity

Refreshments, compliments of “Barakevet”

Every Monday between 5 PM – 8 PM at the Mesila Park “Book Stop” (behind Mekor Haim 48, near the Rami Levi Supermarket)

Free of charge!

Come join the fun!

 ___________________________

cornsky

KING CORN

For the past few weeks, your boxes have contained the king of summer, his royal highness the corn. Every year it accompanies us from June to November, joins us while we bid the schoolyear farewell, enjoys our summer vacation and then goes back to school with us, come fall. In essence, the corn crop begins to ripen when the weather turns warm but still has an occasional breezy day, moves headlong into the intolerable heat of July-August and the heatwaves of September, breathes a sigh of relief in October, makes certain that moderate weather has returned, and only then says goodbye in November. Now that’s what I call a king!

This week, American citizens celebrated the independence of their homeland, the Birthplace of Corn, so in everyone’s honor, we shall sing a song of praise to the sweet, yellow cob!

Corn is probably one of the first crops the Americans learned to grow. Approximately 7,000 years ago, some gleaners (probably women) noticed a spontaneous mutant among the weeds, a teosinte, with a cob that was longer and filled with seeds that were larger than your average ancient weed. Something sparked their intuition, and they tasted it – to their great delight. They also discovered that seeds which fell to the ground sprouted and became a mature plant that yielded more cobs. After some time, they learned that if they kept the better seeds and planted them, the next crop would be even more improved!

At the next stage, they (no longer gleaners, but now also farmers) discovered that if they grow corn, beans and squash, they could actually make a decent basic diet out of them. The plants also grew well together: the corn acted as a supporting pole for the bean to climb upon, and the squash grew on the earth as live mulch, preventing weeds and keeping moisture in. This proved to be so time-efficient that it gave the people enough spare moments to build houses, weave rugs and baskets, develop astronomy and math, and of course- party…

To your left is the olden corn, and to your right is its current cultured form:

Today, corn is one of the only plants which cannot reproduce without a human helping hand, as it requires the planting of separate seeds in order for the plant to sprout.

In various languages, corn was granted venerable names. The first to bring corn to Europe were the Spanish, and they gave it a name from the native Taino: mahis in Taino, maize in Spanish. The meaning in Taino is “the seed that gives life.” The Latin name continued this theme, calling it Zea (life giver) mays.

Only when the wonder vegetable emigrated to Europe did it receive its dull, listless name “corn” that was a generic name for grains (even salt grains, hence “corned beef”), and the derogatory titles “Turkey wheat,” “Turkey/Egyptian corn,” or “Indian corn.” Apparently they were not referring to the origins of the grain, but rather making a social comment that this was an uncultivated, wild, barbaric grain, as compared to “polite” cultured European grains. The Hebrew name tiras was given based on the English Turkey corn. The word tiras is mentioned in the Bible in the books of Genesis and Chronicles. Tiras was Jefeth’s seventh son (Noah’s grandson). Scholars identified Tiras as the father of the Turkish nation (Tractate Yoma), which is why the “Turkish” grain was granted this name.

Its lackluster name certainly does not reflect the sweet, positive nature of this wonderful grain, upon which the world of South American natives was once so dependent. And perhaps the come-down of the name from “life giving” to “wild grain” somewhat reflects the devaluation of this outstanding plant in the western world.

American natives used corn in various manners: eating it fresh or cooked, drying the cob and grinding it into flour, pounding the fresh grains to produce polenta- a wet corn porridge; decorating the house with colorful strings of corn, fashioning cornhusk dolls, popping it for popcorn, feeding animals the cobs, etc. All parts of the corn had advantages and uses: using corn stalks for building, fishing, etc.; the corn “beard” was used as a medicinal herb to cure kidney ailments, and the cornhusks were used to weave mats and baskets and create masks, moccasins and dolls.

Today, too, we are dependent upon corn in every realm, especially food: Almost every processed food contains corn, but of a very limited genetically-engineered variety that appears in its processed, worn and abused form, totally bereft of nutritional value and, of course, a product which demands an excessive exertion of energy.

We use corn starch for thickening and gluing, and corn syrup for sweetening. Expansion materials, emulsifiers, food coloring, citric acid— all are derived from corn, as well as most of the animal fodder in the meat industry. Corn also serves a role in the production of plastic and oil. (Those who wish to learn more about corn and food in our world are highly recommended to read Michael Pollan’s The Omnivore’s Dilemma.)

But for all its many uses, there is nothing like simply sinking your teeth into a fresh ear of corn. There are those who do not trust the Kashrut of corn. They fear that tiny insects lying within the corn silk will find their way into the kernels, becoming impossible to detect and remove.  Dror, one of our loyal deliverymen, recently told me that he heard from a “Sunfrost” mashgiach (kashruth supervisor) how to deal with this matter. According to him, the bugs run towards the cob when they are exposed to light, as the corn is peeled and its silk removed. The solution is simple and creative: peel the corn in the dark! This way, the bugs remain in the silk and get tossed to the compost. You are more than welcome to try this out at home…

Enjoy!

And somewhat late, but forever timely: Happy Birthday to Talya Seligman, our website queen, who celebrated her 40th birthday last week. Here’s wishing you all the best in the world!

A good week to us all and a joyous Eid al-Fitr to Mohammed, Ali and Majdi. May we enjoy the month of Tammuz and summer vacation!

Alon, Bat Ami, Dror, Yochai and the entire Chubeza team

______________________________________
 

WHAT’S JOINING KING CORN IN THIS WEEK’S BOXES?

Monday: Lettuce, parsley/coriander, tomatoes, cucumbers/fakus, zucchini, eggplant, watermelon/melon, New Zealand spinach/Swiss chard, corn, Amoro squash. Small boxes only: onions.

Large box, in addition: Acorn squash, Thai lubia (yard long baens)/cherry tomatoes, nana mint/basil, potatoes.

Wednesday: Lettuce, parsley/ nana mint/basil, New Zealand spinach/Swiss chard, tomatoes, cucumbers/fakus, zucchini, potatoes,  Amoro squash/slice of Provence pumpkin, corn, watermelon/melon. small boxes: cherry tomatoes/eggplants.

Large box, in addition: Thai lubia (yard long baens)/cherry tomatoes/okra, eggplants, onions. acorn squash.

Messages… August 26th-28th 2013

Changes in delivery dates over the holidays:
• § During the week of Rosh Hashanah:  The Wednesday delivery will be moved up to Tuesday, September 3rd.   (Monday deliveries as usual.)
• § The week between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur: All deliveries as usual.
• § During the week that Sukkot begins: The Wednesday delivery will be moved up to Tuesday, September 17th.  (Monday deliveries as usual.)
• § During Chol HaMoed Sukkot, there will be no deliveries, thus you will not be receiving boxes on Monday and Wednesday, the 23rd and 25th of September.
If you wish to increase your vegetable boxes before the holidays, please advise as soon as possible.

Open Day at Chubeza:
In keeping with our twice-yearly tradition, we invite you for a Chol HaMoed “pilgrimage” to Chubeza to celebrate our Open Day.
The Sukkot Open Day will take place on Tuesday, September 24th , the 20th of Tishrei (fifth day of Chol HaMoed), between 12:00-17:00.
The Open Day gives us a chance to meet, tour the field, and nibble on vegetables and other delicacies. Children have their own tailor-made tours, designed for little feet and curious minds, plus special activities and a vast space to run around and loosen up.  (So can the adults…)

Driving instructions are on our website under “Contact Us.” Please make sure you check this before heading our way.

Wishing you a Chag Sameach and Shana Tova from all of us at Chubeza
We look forward to seeing you all!
________________________
In preparation for the upcoming holidays, here are some fun new products you can add to your boxes:
• Manu, our bread baker par excellence, resumes her baking next week. You are welcome to add her delectable bread and other pastries to your boxes.
• Tamir, our beekeeper from Moshav Sha’al, visited us with Zohar, his sweet daughter, and brought along a new stock of raspberry honey and a slice of beeswax. May we all have a sweet year!
• Eliezer and Rose of Shoreshe Zion have two new seasonal products for the end of the summer: chili sauce and pickled okra.

All these new products are updated in our order system for easy addition to your weekly boxes. For instructions on how to use the system, if needed, take a look at this explanation.
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Still no newsletter this week, but we promise to return next week!

A note about the corn:
We know many of you have been anxiously awaiting the corn, but over the past few weeks the ears have arrived wormy and not so attractive. We would like to promise a wormless future, but unfortunately we are at the peak of the season for corn borer worms, moths that lays eggs in the corn which hatch and become caterpillars… Some years they do not do a lot of damage, but this year we are facing a large, hungry group of worms, and I fear we will be seeing still more of them this season.
We are attempting to confront this problem using biological pesticides, by spraying “probit” on our plants. It contains the BT bacteria which damage the caterpillar’s digestive system, preventing them from nibbling at our corn. But with biological and organic pest control, the results are usually gradual and require a lot of patience… When I worked in the U.S. where the worm situation was even worse, there was a saying that wormless corn is probably not organic. We would comfort our clients by saying that what’s good for the caterpillars must be good for us too…

We recommend you try to wash the corn, slice off the tip and see if the clean cob works for you. If you are very deterred by the worms and do not feel the need to do your part for the worms of the world, just request we remove corn from your box this season. But as the weather cools down a bit, the problem should be solved.

In the boxes this week:

Monday: cilantro/mint (nana), butternut squash, pumpkin, tomatoes, potatoes, Thai long beans/okra, cherry tomatoes, cucumbers, green onions/chive, corn/peppers, leeks

In the large box, in addition: New Zealand spinach, eggplants, parsley

Wednesday: green onions/chive, butternut squash, pumpkin, tomatoes, potatoes, Thai long beans/okra, cucumbers, leeks, , parsley, cilantro/thyme, lettuce/carrots/sweet potatoes

In the large box, in addition: eggplants, mint (nana), cherry tomatoes