May 16th-18th 2022 – Squish Squash

Just in case you missed this important news:

GADI & TAMIR’S EXTRAORDINARY BLUEBERRIES ARE HERE!!!

Over the past five years, in a small plot in Teqoa, Gadi and Tamir have been growing blueberries and raspberries, painting the desert fringe blue and purple. Gadi Afik, an agronomist specializing in blueberries, and Tamir Deutsch, an organic farmer and long-time friend, joined forces to meet the challenge of raising blueberries and raspberries in Israel.

Blueberries need special conditions to grow, including acidic soil, thus they’re grown on detached beds inside large containers. Cold weather agrees with them, and when frost gathers outside, it warms Gadi and Tamir’s hearts. To maintain an accurate level of acidity in the soil, Gadi and Tamir use (non-organic) fertilization, but throughout their growth the berries are not sprayed.

Their nutritional and health values are high: Rich in antioxidants, Vitamins C, K and other minerals, blueberries are known to prevent inflammation in the blood vessels and to lower cholesterol. They are recommended as a fruit portion for diabetics, as these berries can lower sugar levels in the blood. And we haven’t even mentioned the tantalising flavour…

19.5 NIS per 125 gram package | 72 NIS per 500 gram package

Blueberry season is short! Only 2-3 months! Add them to your boxes today via our order system.

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Summer is comming soon, and for some weeks now you’ve been receiving one of the first vegetables spring arrivals – the squash. And there’s more varieties on the way! Squash comes in a range of colors, including the light Galilean squash and dark green zucchini as well as the yellow and striped zucchini. As the leader of the band, we happily dedicate our exuberant end-of-Spring Newsletter to this remarkable vegetable

Squash belong to the prominent Cucurbitaceae family, a very diverse, widespread clan whose members are grown primarily for food, but also for other interesting uses. Within the subdivision of cultivated plants, the family tree splits off into five main branches: 1. cucumber, fakus and melon; 2. watermelon; 3. various types of pumpkins and squashes; 4. the decorative, inedible pumpkin that is used for decorations and to make serving utensils and musical instruments; and 5. Lupa pumpkins, whose skin is used to prepare natural sponges.

Pumpkins and squash are close cousins, different treatments affect their characteristics:

Pumpkins are harvested at maturity after a long growth period of 3-5 months, when their shell is hard and the seeds within are stiff and plump. Usually we seed them before cooking. Conversely, squash is harvested young, after only one or two months of growth. Its peel is still soft, and chafes easily. The seeds are thin and barely discernible, which is why there’s no need to remove them before eating.

Squash and pumpkins are natives of Central America. Columbus introduced them to the Europeans, who first grew them only in botanical gardens, enjoying their beautiful blossoms. The Israelites, pleading “We remember the fish we ate in Egypt at no cost–also the squash, melons, leeks, onions and garlic…” apparently were not craving what we call squash, but probably the fakus, their African/Mid-Eastern cousin, as we explained last week.

Even within its very own family, squash varieties vary from one sibling to another. The Mid-Eastern squash is chubby and light green. His longer and thinner brothers, the zucchinis, received their name from the Italian zucca for pumpkin, thus “a small pumpkin.” Chubeza grows dark green, yellow and striped zucchini. And there are also round squash varieties used to stuff, and even beautiful flower-shaped squash.

Preparation for squash season starts here at the end of winter. We sow our squash seeds in the beginning of February when it’s still mighty cold.  To protect them, we cover the earth with a plastic surface, and cover the seeds with another plastic cover to insulate them from the cold. The result is a sort of tunnel that heats up from the sunrays and acts as a shield from the biting frost and any end-of-winter storms. Usually in the first rounds, we use transplants as well as seeds. The seeds need relatively high temperatures in order to sprout, while transplants have priority since they are more mature and can grow in lower temperatures as well.

In the annals of Chubeza, there were years when our first squash crops suffered a mysterious disappearance due to the young sprouts being eaten, probably by crickets or other earthy inhabitants. This was another reason to choose transplants during this season, attempting to outwit the pests.

When wintertime makes room for spring and it gets too hot under the plastic, we cover the squash plants in Agril – a cloth made of non-woven material. These sheets are very thin but insulated. They are not opaque, allowing the sunrays to penetrate, but are relatively strong. In winter we use Agril to protect the delicate greens from possible hail damage, and in springtime we spread it over the Cucurbitaceae family in the first stages of their growth to protect them from insects.

These aren’t your average vegetarian insects who need to feast on some squash greens, but rather flies, mosquitos and other fly-by insects who merely wish to land a hand or leg on the squash. The problem is that they aren’t great about hygiene, and therefore transmit viruses and diseases that damage the young squash plants. The viruses and leaf diseases are the worse problems this gourd family encounters, with the squash, fakus, melons and various small pumpkins being the most sensitive of all. Which is why we cover them with cloth as they start their lives in the world, just like we would put up a screen at home to prevent flying insects from entering our living space. Once the squash begins to bloom, we remove the cover, because it’s a whole new concert now, and for this segment we do need the humming of flying insects…

So how does squash move from being a green, impressive plant to actually ripening and bearing fruit? Along the way, there are the big, beautiful yellow flowers, lovely to look at and particularly attractive to yellow-loving pests. The squash plant bears two types of flowers: male and female (everything written about squash holds true for pumpkins, cucumbers, melons, watermelons, fakus and the rest of the Cucurbita or gourd family). Both types of flowers resemble each other from afar, but when you look closely, the differences are evident.

The insects, thrilled by the bright yellow, enter the male flower, have their fun, and gather some nectar and pollen that look like this:

pollen-on-male-squash

Then they continue on to frolic in the next nearby playground, the female flower, spreading the male pollen all over. The now-fertilized female flower closes and shrinks, and at the end of the process looks like this:

pollinated-zucchini

If you look closely, you will see that at the edge of this flower, a fresh, new little squash is growing. It’ll only take him a few days before he is ready for careful and delicate picking, so as not to scratch or damage the shiny, delicate peel. Squash grow so quickly that we harvest them daily. A squash forgotten on the bush will be discovered a few days later in monster-like dimensions…

Squash is low in calories and high in dietary fiber. It contains magnesium, potassium and folic acid, Vitamins A and C and other antioxidants. Zucchini has a fresh, neutral flavor (some call it bland), but no need for a PR campaign: its neutral taste is probably the ingredient that made zucchini a favorite child in almost every country. In France they are used in ratatouille and quiches; in Italy they are prize components of caponata, frittata, antipasti and pasta primavera. The Italians also harbor a special affection for stir-fried zucchini flowers. Romania and Bulgaria cook it in a givetch, in Turkey it stars in patties, in the Middle East one can stuff it with rice and chopped meat, and Iraqis use squash generously in kubeh soup or sauce. In the Far East, zucchini and squash are stir-fried together in a wok, while in the United States they make their way into yummy bread and zucchini jam……

But hey, zucchini can also be eaten with no cooking, frying or baking whatsoever. Just squeeze them to make squash juice, a great detox for the body, or enjoy them fresh in your salad, a la cucumbers. On days when cucumber shortages struck Chubeza, we cheerfully chopped zucchini to fill our family lunch salad, which was polished off in seconds.

And on this hopeful and yummy note, we wish you a good, calm week,
From all of us at Chubeza

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WHAT’S IN THIS WEEK’S BOXES?

This last week, we’re once again experiencing a Basic Vegetable shortage – this time in tomatoes. Our tomato plants are currently between growth rounds, as is the case for the entire organic market. Thus, there are not enough tomatoes to go around for every box. To bring a ray of cheer despite the missing tomatoes, we are sending peppers in some boxes instead.

Monday: Parsley root/celery stalk, carrots, coriander/dill/parsley, potatoes, beets, onions, Swiss chard/kale/New Zealand spinach, squash/zucchini, tomatoes/peppers, cucumbers, lettuce.

Large box, in addition: Cabbage, garlic, kohlrabi.

FRUIT BOXES:  Loquat (shesek), avocados, pears/apples/nectarines, bananas/clementinas.

Wednesday: Parsley root/celery stalk, carrots, coriander/dill/parsley, potatoes, beets, onions, Swiss chard/kale/New Zealand spinach, squash/zucchini/Fakus (armenian cucumber), tomatoes/peppers, cucumbers, lettuce.

Large box, in addition: Cabbage/sweet potatoes, garlic/scallion, kohlrabi/slice of pumpkin.

FRUIT BOXES:  Avocados, pears/apples, nectarines, bananas/pomelit, clementinas.

May 9th-11th 2-022 – Cucs!

We’ve waited patiently for them since last year and now the time has come: Gadi and Tamir’s excellent blueberries are here! (with raspberries  following shortly!)

Over the past five years, in a small plot in Teqoa, Gadi and Tamir have been growing blueberries and raspberries, painting the desert fringe blue and purple. Gadi Afik, an agronomist specializing in blueberries, and Tamir Deutsch, an organic farmer and long-time friend, joined forces to meet the challenge of raising blueberries and raspberries in Israel.

Blueberries need special conditions to grow, including acidic soil, thus they’re grown on detached beds inside large containers. Cold weather agrees with them, and when frost gathers outside, it warms Gadi and Tamir’s hearts. To maintain an accurate level of acidity in the soil, Gadi and Tamir use (non-organic) fertilization, but throughout their growth the berries are not sprayed.

Their nutritional and health values are high: Rich in antioxidants, Vitamins C, K and other minerals, blueberries are known to prevent inflammation in the blood vessels and to lower cholesterol. They are recommended as a fruit portion for diabetics, as these berries can lower sugar levels in the blood. And we haven’t even mentioned the tantalising flavour…

19.5 NIS per 125 gram package | 72 NIS per 500 gram package

Blueberry season is short! Only 2-3 months! Add them to your boxes today via our order system.

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And, speaking of the science of Life, have you got the cucumber sandwiches cut for Lady Bracknell?

Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest

But then what does one do when this science of life, i.e., cucumbers, undergoes a hard winter? At the close of this winter, all the organic farmers in the country were confronted with a major shortage in cucumbers, and I found myself thinking about this ‘science of life’ and why it is disorienting when the cucumber supply is amiss. Cucumbers are a permanent component of our boxes, thus generally taken for granted. Then, in times of shortage, we feel that something has gone wrong: where are those familial faces? Should we be worried? Has something gone terribly wrong in the world…?

This winter’s extreme temperatures (which was nonetheless blessed in many agricultural aspects) brought with it a frost that damaged our cucumber bushes. Though new cucumbers were planted, the cold temperatures persisted. Even when the cucumbers weren’t frosted over, they were greatly influenced by the cold weather, which slowed them down to the point they simply did not budge. Thus, they remained small and struggling. Luckily for us, patience is one of the cucumber’s virtues, in addition to its very impressive growth characteristics. As soon as the weather warmed up a bit, they renewed their growth spurt and quickly caught up.

Cucumbers grow in our greenhouse all winter – a single winter child of the Cucurbit family. In a short time, he will be joined by all the cousins, nieces and nephews from this very prominent family – the first to visit us in springtime. So just before he is smothered with hugs and kisses from those who missed him over winter, we’re happy to provide the cucumber with its seven minutes of solo fame:

Cucumbers originated in the heart of the Indian subcontinent. This very ancient domesticated vegetable has been raised by the human farmer for over 3,000 years. By virtue of being so ancient, today there is almost no place in the world where a wild cucumber grows.  This versatile veggie spread to China, North Africa, Europe and the Middle East even before written documentation could be had. The Biblical Hebrews craved it when they went out of Egypt—their mouths watered as they “remember… the squash,” but they actually are referring to “cucumbers” and not the squash we know today. But this is not the only complicated part. The Hebrew word Melafefon derives from the Greek melopepon – meaning ‘an apple melon,’ which probably refers to squash or melon…

The cucumber is a vegetable that needs heat in order to grow and yield. Thus, in wintertime it can only be grown in a hothouse (which is warmed up by plastic walls that protect them from the cold… until it didn’t this past winter). In the open field, cucumber plants spread out in all directions, similar to their aunt squash or cousins melon and watermelon. Within the greenhouse, the cucumber is grown by trellising – i.e., climbing on strong strings which stretch upward, allowing the cucumber to curl itself around them all by itself using its tendrils (curly stems growing from the leaf’s bottom). Thus, we can grow many plants in a way that allows for cross ventilation among the stems, while the cucumber can do its growing and climbing and yielding of beautiful, bountiful elongated fruit.

The original cucumber is monoecious, meaning the male and female flowers grow on the same plant. The “traditional” summer cucumber species start by producing male flowers, which then are combined with female flowers to create bi-gender flowers, concluding with only female flowers. These cucumber species require pollination by pollinating insects that transfer the powder from the male to the female flowers. In breeding the species by crossbreeding and selection, new gynoecious hybrid cultivars were developed that produce almost all female blossoms which are parthenocarpic (virgin fruits, without fertilization or formation of “real” seeds). These varieties do not need to be fertilized, an act that might even hurt the quality of the fruit, which is why growing them in a greenhouse where they are isolated from pollinating insects is beneficial.

Greenhouse cucumbers look somewhat different from the open-field varieties: they are smoother and more uniform in appearance, and they have round edges, as compared to the little point at the ends of the open-field cucumbers. There are also open-field cucumbers grown in Israel, but those are aimed mostly towards the “industry,” i.e., pickling.

There are many varieties of cucumbers in the world, of course, other than the “Israeli” cucumber we discussed. There are also huge greenhouse cucumbers, sold in Europe and the United States, individually Saran-wrapped, called “Dutch” “British” or “European.” There are the long, thin Asian species, and tiny white cucumbers. There is even a “lemon cucumber” which grows to be round and yellow. Its seeds are big, and its taste is a bit sour.

This year we are growing a new type of cucumber of Japanese origin called Aromato, developed by the Israeli-based Hazera Company, after discovering it in a global food exhibit. The Aromato is very long and thin, compared to the Israeli cucumber.  At the time, Hazera was working in tandem with the “Aroma” coffee chain on a different project, and suggested that Aroma try out the new cucumber in their salads. In a gesture of appreciation towards the “guinea pigs,” the cucumber was named Aromato after the chain, albeit with a Japanese variation. You will meet them in your boxes in the near future. Thy are solid and crunchy, and less liquid, creating a concentrated flavor in a cucumber that hardly drips liquid when sliced. We think they’re great!

A popular use for cucumbers, other than biting into them, is cutting them in circles and placing them on the eyes. What do cucumbers actually do to the eyes? They cool and freshen them. Underneath the peeling, the cucumber is seven degrees cooler than the outside world. The fresh juice of the vegetable cools down the skin, cures it and flexes it. For treatment of light sunburn, it is recommended to place cucumbers slice on the damaged area, or to gently smear cucumber juice. Cucumber strips on the forehead are a classic folk cure for headaches. So are cucumber strips on aching feet, as well as 30 minutes of rest…

People tend to peel the cucumber, but this is really unnecessary. Basically, it is recommended to eat as many fruits and vegetables with their peeling intact, which adds dietary fibers to the food and slows down the release of sugar from the food into the blood (vital for those who suffer from such sugar-related ailments as diabetes, Candida, fungus, sugar addiction, etc.). Also, leaving the peeling intact keeps the vitamins close at hand, especially the antioxidants.

The cucumber is considered a cooler in Chinese medicine: a diuretic thirst-quenching vegetable that helps cleanse the body of toxins. It is considered to be a sweet vegetable that assists the digestive organs, rich in high-quality water (because plants purify their own water), containing calcium, potassium, beta carotene C and a trace of vitamin B.

In all honesty, even vegetable fussies are usually willing to take a bite out of cucumbers, which sometimes marks the beginning of a beautiful friendship! Scour our vegetable recipe section for many interesting, innovative cucumbers delights. Totally worth a peek!

May we all enjoy a satiating, cleansing, and refreshing week, chock full of juice.

Alon, Bat Ami, Orin, Dror and the Chubeza team

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WHAT’S JOINING THE CUCUMBERS IN THIS WEEK’S BOXES?

Monday: Fennel/kohlrabi, carrots, coriander/dill/parsley, potatoes, beets, onions/garlic, Swiss chard/kale/New Zealand spinach, zucchini, tomatoes, cucumbers, lettuce. 

Large box, in addition: Cabbage/sweet potatoes, parsley root/pumpkin slice, celeriac/celery stalk.      

FRUIT BOXES:  Pears/apples, avocados, nectarines, bananas.

Wednesday: Carrots, coriander/dill/parsley, potatoes, beets, onions, parsley root/garlic, Swiss chard/kale/New Zealand spinach, zucchini, tomatoes/cherry tomatoes/peppers, cucumbers, lettuce. 

Large box, in addition: Fennel/kohlrabi, cabbage/sweet potatoes/pumpkin slice, celery.      

FRUIT BOXES:  Pears/apples, avocados, nectarines, bananas/clemantinot.

May 2-4, 2022 – Wheat Lives On

Great New Products for Spring!

Spring, the season of renewal, is bringing a bevy of very special new Additional Products available from Chubeza!

Last week, we introduced Tal Ron’s outstanding Cashew Cheeses. For those who missed it, here’s a glimpse:

These very special cheeses, which Tal produces in Carmei Yosef, are available in five flavors: natural, garlic dill, fig, sun-dried tomatoes, and Kalamata olives. Each product weighs 180 grams, and costs 37 NIS.

This week, we are delighted to introduce you to a new cracker, brought to us through the heartfelt efforts of “Heart of Nature.” These crackers, made of flax seeds, are gluten-free and thus very low in carbs. Heart of Nature crackers are compatible with paleo/ketogenic diets, rich in dietary fiber, and free of preservatives, sugar, artificial additives or genetically- engineered products.

The crackers come in boxes of 125 gr at a cost of 18 NIS

Add these tasty, healthy treats to your Chubeza boxes via our order system

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The Wheat Still Grows

As farmers for nearly 19 years, we know that one of the most joyful aspects of agriculture is the seasonal renewal and the crops that accompany each season. Every autumn, we sow and plant the crops we longed for in summer. In spring, we sow and plant the crops that were deep in slumber over the winter. And alongside the old familiar rhythm of farming, we like to try our hand at something new every year: a new crop variety, a different growth method, an idea we haven’t tried in awhile.

This year’s newbie has already sprouted in vast areas across the field, growing wide and tall, greening then yellowing, and accompanying us throughout the entire winter all the way to spring. Because this year we grew wheat!

Which is not to say we will now be producing bread and cake or adding grains of wheat to your boxes. Chubeza’s wheat in the field is meant to be used as a “cover crop,” “green manure” or “beneficial crop.” Why a cover crop? Because these wheat plots cover parts of the field which otherwise would have remained exposed over the past winter.

Essentially, organic farming gives the crops a Sabbatical every year. After we finish growing on a particular plot, we usually let it rest for a few weeks or months (depending on how much land we have and how much we need to hurry and replant the plot). Fortunately, at Chubeza we have reached the point where there is more than enough space to allow the plots a good rest between crops.

Yet sometimes a field’s winter slumber can boomerang and create more problems than it solves. An empty field and an abundance of rain can cause a profusion of weeds which need to be cut again and again. Rainstorms can also cause major soil erosion, since (despite the weeds), the earth lacks sufficient roots to hold onto the soil and prevent it from being washed away.

This is where cover crops come in to save the day.

The only thing we asked from the wheat we planted last winter was to grow. But by mere natural coincidence, without being expected to yield vegetables, the wheat crop generated many gifts for us: because the wheat was densely sown, it expanded and filled the soil in its plots, preventing   weeds from developing. By covering the exposed soil, the wheat’s deep, strong roots prevented the soil from being washed away by the winter rain. These wondrous deep roots also ventilated the soil, improving its texture and delighting the microbes and other creatures celebrating deep down below, as well as giving the the beneficial, much-needed insects a great place to spend the winter season (much nicer than the exposed field).

A sneak peek at the sheer beauty, from sprouting to yellowing:

Our wheat was grown to feed the sheep belonging to Gabi, our tractor driver, thus we let it grow leisurely and fill its beautiful seeds bursting with proteins. This past winter has been ideal for the wheat crop (and many others as well) – abundant with timely, beneficial rains, spaced at good intervals and accompanied by nice cold spells, enabling the wheat to enjoy exuberant growth. Around two weeks before Passover, it was harvested and gathered into long mounds along the field, waiting to be bound into sheaves. Precisely at the start of the Passover festival, the harvested wheat was collected into huge, well-spaced bales. Those who visited us on the Open Day saw the full array of bales standing along the field, ready to be taken to the sheep. Here they are:

When wheat is harvested, the roots and part of the stem are left in the field. Once the fields are sowed again, they will be assimilated into the soil and slowly decompose. All this green energy composts within the clods of earth, adding health, strength and contentment.

In summer, we valiantly attempt to deal with the weeds, which fiercely compete with our crops, thus we cover the earth as much as possible. This time, the cover is over the bed where our vegetables grow, not a free, open space. During the spring and summer, along with the rapid growth of our crops, the weeds are rushing right along to grow. Cultivating the soil around the plants is an excellent way to prevent (or at least greatly reduce) the growth of weeds that will compete with crops for food and water and disturb their growth. Thus, during the summer, many beds in our field are covered by biodegradable plastic (made from corn, which at the end of the season is simply stretched into the soil where it disintegrates), in which we cut round holes in which the vegetables are planted.

This summer covering also protects the earth’s dampness and prevents the harsh summer sun from rapidly drying up the earth. If you put your hand under the covering, you’ll discover pleasantly damp soil, several degrees lower than the nearby exposed soil. Here are eggplant seedlings basking happily beneath the covering:

Hopefully these weeks, replete with days of sadness and joy for our nation, will pass well, that these pictures of renewed growth will soften the sharpness of reality a bit, and that we too will learn to find the balance between exposure and coverage and know how to grow within this balance.

Id sa’id to Muchamed and Majdi as they celebrate Id al Fitr at the close of the month of Ramadan.

Wishing you all a good week, from all of us at Chubeza

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WHAT’S IN THIS WEEK’S BOXES?

Monday: Parsley/parsley root, carrots, coriander/dill, cabbage/fennel, beets/kohlrabi, leeks/onions, Swiss chard/kale, zucchini/peas/pumpkin, tomatoes, cucumbers, lettuce.

Large box, in addition: Potatoes/sweet potatoes, garlic, celeriac/celery stalk.

FRUIT BOXES:  Pears, green or red apples, avocados, bananas, pink grapefruit.

Wednesday: Parsley/coriander/dill, carrots, beets, onions, Swiss chard/kale/New Zealand spinach, zucchini/pumpkin, peas/potatoes/sweet potatoes, tomatoes, cucumbers, lettuce, celeriac/celery stalk.

Large box, in addition: Garlic/leeks, cabbage/fennel, parsley root.

FRUIT BOXES:  Pears, green or red apples, avocados, bananas, pink grapefruit.

Thank you for your visit on our Open Day Festival!

A Happy Start for Spring  

This week, we are delighted to add to Chubeza’s line of special products to add to your vegetable vegetable boxes the outstanding Cashew Cheeses prepared by Tal of Karmei Yosef, right near us. Tal’s personal story is special and inspiring:

Hello everyone, I am Tal Ron. My wife Limor and I, our five children and three granddaughters all live in Carmei Yosef.

During my wonderful life, I’ve worked in many professions, from being a film and television director, to a glass bead artist, through to becoming a sourdough bread baker. Today, I make a living from holding small events and workshops in our vineyard.

Several months ago, I was diagnosed with cancer, which gave me the impetus to make a major change in my life: I threw out milk and gluten, started eating only organic vegetables, meditating, qigong, taking walks, and everything that could be done for my health. But slowly the lust for cheese crept in and began gnawing away at my stomach…

I began buying vegan cheeses, checking online recipes, and comprehending more about the production process. I then entered the kitchen and started an endless series of experiments, until I reached the final product. I did all this for myself, but the minute my friends began tasting my creations, the flow of cheese requests increased by leaps and bounds.

We are now taking another major step: After tasting the cheeses, Chubeza has willingly and enthusiastically agreed to offer you to enjoy the cheeses as well. I am very excited at this opportunity, and thank Chubeza from the bottom of my heart.

For me, cheese making has become a crucial part of my healing process, which is progressing well, thank God. I am treated only with plants, medicinal mushrooms and vitamins, which is why we called our cheese production B’shvil Habriut (“for health”).

B’shvil Habriut cheeses are available in five flavors: natural, garlic dill, fig, sun-dried tomatoes, and Kalamata olives. Each product weighs 180 grams, and costs 37 NIS. They will be sent to Chubeza customers frozen, to arrive in a cold, solid state. Keep them refrigerated. Just before being served, take the cheeses out of the fridge to enable them to be served soft.

May we all enjoy as much good health and happiness as ever. We hope you’ll enjoy our cheeses and will be happy to hear your comments: 0522771212.

ADD TAL’S VERY SPECIAL CHEESES – AND A HOST OF OTHER WONDERFUL PRODUCTS – TO YOUR BOXES VIA CHUBEZA’S ORDER SYSTEM TODAY!

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What fun we — and you too, of course – had at our Open Day at the Farm last week! After a long, painful Corona-caused two-year break, this Open Day was a true cause for celebration in the field.

The truth is that this time I was really emotional (those who joined the first tour heard me get really choked up…). At Chubeza, we chose to grow vegetables, but also community. This twice-yearly event is important for us to emerge from the pleasant field bubble and personally meet the faces, voices, questions and thoughts of our members. The pandemic put a halt to this, and during the daily race it became hard for us to feel just how much this was lacking.

This year, from the minute we began preparations for the Open Day, I already felt us filling with energy and joy. When you started to arrive, with smiling faces and shining eyes, our hearts were overjoyed.

It is a true pleasure to thank all those involved in the planning and operation of the Open Day. Our great thanks to all the dedicated and wonderful Chubeza staff, without whom we could not have held the event.

To the field crew, who deftly set up and organized the entire area

To Majdi and Muhammad, who took command of the vegetable stand at the packing house.

To Shar, who washed and peeled and cut vegetables for yummy noshes.

To Einat, who, as always, helped to improve and repair all that was needed, headed the cooking corner, took photos, and more.

To Gabi, the amazing Tractor Driver who provided quite a few kids (and probably adults as well) an unforgettable experience.

To Talia and Noga, Bat-Ami’s daughters, who came in the morning to help with the organizing, prepared arts and crafts samples and headed the Art Corner with patience and kindness.

And, of course, to those of you who came. Thank you so much for attending, and thank you to everyone who introduced themselves. It’s always nice to connect there in person and get to know you really well, not just through correspondence or phone calls.

We had great fun! Hope you did too!

Wishing everyone a pleasant, calm return to Routine, and nice spring days. (Get out, go see and savor this amazing burst of Nature’s beauty!)

From all of us at Chubeza

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WHAT’S IN THIS WEEK’S BOXES?

Monday: Parsley root/celeriac/celery stalk, carrots, coriander/parsley/dill, cabbage/fennel, zucchini/slice of pumpkin, fresh garlic, Swiss chard/kale, fresh fava beans/snow peas or garden peas, tomatoes, cucumbers, lettuce/curly lettuce.

Large box, in addition: Beets, fresh onion bunch/leeks, potatoes/sweet potatoes.

FRUIT BOXES:  Pomelas, avocados, oranges, bananas, apples/pears.

Wednesday: Parsley root/parsley, carrots, coriande/dill, cabbage/fennel, zucchini/slice of pumpkin/snow peas or garden peas, Swiss chard/kale, fresh onion bunch/leeks, tomatoes, cucumbers, lettuce/curly lettuce, beets.

Large box, in addition: Celeriac/celery stalk, fresh garlic, potatoes/sweet potatoes.

FRUIT BOXES:  Pomelas/lemons, avocados, oranges, bananas/clemantinot, apples/pears.

Come visit us on the open day this week on Wednesday!

Mo’adim Le’Simcha!

We’d like to remind you that on the Passover holiday we do not send boxes. So this week there will be no delivery tomorrow, April 18th and Wednesday, April 20th.

Instead of coming to you, we invite you to us for an open day to celebrate with us in the field.
This year we have a pleasant spring, and the celebration will take place on Wednesday, 19 Nissan, April 20 at 11:00-15:00.

On the open day we have the opportunity to meet, tour the field, snack on vegetables, create and chat.
We are also operating a vegetable stand so you can fill in what you are missing that week.

This is also a great opportunity to introduce your friends to Chubeza!

At this time, as we fervently hope to bid a final farewell to Corona, the pressure on orders has lessened. We are now open to new clients. If you have friends who would like to get to know us, invite them to the Open Day! It’s a perfect opportunity to see and understand what Chubeza is all about.

This year we will create with herbs – now is their prime time – sage, lemon verbana, lemongrass, hyssop, oregano, lavender, rosemary, etc. These are plants whose uses are many and varied – for disinfection and perfume, for seasoning and infusion – we will make tea bags, perfumed bags or spice mixtures for seasoning.

In the cooking corner we will make lettuce sandwiches – inspired by Hillel who used to wrap a matzah charoset and maror – we will wrap spreads & vegetables with lettuce.

Yoga workshop for couples (parent and child, two children, two adults …) led by Einat – acquaintance with several yoga poses as a connecting activity between two. Feel free to come in comfortable clothes and bring a yoga mat (not required – there will be mats). At 13:00.

Field tours set out every hour to wander through the beds and get to know the vegetables and the stories that accompany their growth. Alon leads a more “professional” tour, Bat-Ami’s tour is more suitable for children. Tour times (approx.): 11:15, 12:15, 13:15, 14:15

The sale of vegetables, fruits and other products from wonderful Israeli producers kosher for Passover will be throughout the day in our packing shed.

Directions to open day celebrations here

We’d love to see you all!