October 7th-10th 2019 – Agricultural thoughts

NEW YEARS 5780 – CHANGES IN CHUBEZA DELIVERY SCHEDULES:

DURING THE WEEK OF YOM KIPPUR:

  • Wednesday deliveries will take place on Thursday October 10.

DURING THE WEEK OF CHOL HAMOED SUKKOT, THERE WILL BE NO DELIVERIES, i.e. no deliveries on Monday October 14 or Wednesday October 16.

DURING THE WEEK OF SIMCHAT TORAH:

  • The Monday delivery will be moved to Tuesday October 22.
  • Wednesday delivery (October 23) will take place as usual.

DURING THE WEEK FOLLOWING SUKKOT AND SIMCHAT TORAH, ROUTINE DELIVERY RETURNS!

OPEN DAY:

In keeping with our twice-yearly tradition, we invite you for a Chol HaMoed “pilgrimage” to Chubeza’s field to celebrate our Open Day.
This year’s festive Sukkot Open Day will take place on Thursday, October 17, the 18th of Tishrei (third day of Chol HaMoed) from 12:00 noon – 5:00 PM.

The Open Day gives us a chance to meet, tour the field, and nosh on vegetables and other delicacies. Children have their own tailor-made tours designed for little feet and curious minds, plus special activities and a vast space to run around and loosen up. (Open to adults as well…)

Driving instructions are on our website under “Contact Us.” Please make sure you check this before heading our way.

Chag Sameach and Shana Tova to all of you from all of us. We look forward to seeing you all!

___________________________________

Over the holiday season, Ish Shel Lechem will not be baking bread, although cookies and crackers are available and may be ordered at any time.

Ido and Carole will resume their regular baking schedule immediately after Sukkot and Simchat Torah.

Happy holidays!

____________________

Pondering the Past Year at Chubeza (Part I)

The New Year is our chance to look back and do our soul-searching with the hindsight vision that was not apparent in Real Time. This Newsletter and the one to come will now give you a glimpse of the review and examination of events-in-the-field which Alon and I have undertaken.

Happily, this past year has been characterized by progress and development at Chubeza. In general, we tend to try out new things, and nearly every year we set out upon new experiments: species we haven’t yet grown, work methods we’ve heard about and opt to attempt, different growing methods and so on. We usually start small with one round of vegetables or a short time span and then draw our conclusions. This year we advanced to the second stage in some of these new endeavors, where positive results gave us the impetus to expand the scope and fine tune the implementation.

One example is our progress in the use of the hothouse. Several years ago, we worked hard to renew and renovate a very old, glum-looking hothouse and carefully learned the various methods of greenhouse  vegetable growth. Next, we constructed a number of tunnels (much smaller than a greenhouse) where we could grow our own tomatoes and cucumbers all year long. We also discovered the advantage of growing other vegetables in these settings over winter (greens, beets, cauliflower and broccoli were some of our newcomers). After new regulations forced us to fence in the entire field in order to separate it from neighboring non-organic fields (which in the past could be done by distance alone), we constructed four new tunnels which also serve as a buffer perimeter, thus gaining growth space and a separation marker at once. The new tunnels are slightly higher than the previous ones, allowing for the superb ventilation that is crucial for growing vegetables in such  structures. At this stage, the first round of tomatoes and cucumbers is approaching ripeness in the new tunnels and we are quite satisfied…

The nice green field with the new tunnels in background

This year we also performed solar disinfection in four veteran growth tunnels. This is the second year we are using the method of loosening the earth, covering it with compost, moistening it and then tightly spreading a plastic cover tucked firmly at the corners to create a vacuum and warm up the earth. This warming results in a disinfection that weakens disease factors within the earth and bolsters its immune system. Last year we attempted this on a small scale by covering only two of the tunnels for two months. Thanks to the successful results, this year we expanded to four tunnels and a three-month growing period. The new solar-fertilized veggies acclimated perfectly, and thus far are free of Pythium (a fatal fungus that can thrive in the earth which causes young plants’ stems to dry up in the closest part to earth). Another fortunate consequence of the solar fertilization method is a general fortification of the earth. At times we encounter weaker areas in the field where growth is slower and lazier for no evident reason, but after cleansing the earth we can actually feel the renewal and strength and the development, even throughout the tunnel. Perfection!

In light of this success, we decided to try cleansing another plot. The scorching summer was nearing its end, but we were willing to enjoy even partial results. We spread a clear cover over the plot at the beginning of September which will remain for a month and a half. Then we will uncover it and plant the autumn yield. We anxiously await the results and a chance to check the veracity of our instinct that a shorter span at the end of summer will prove its value as well.

This year we tried out various new species, including Salanova lettuce, a small, delicate, lovely variety which turned out to be less tasty than the better-known types and thus did not make the Chubeza grade. On the potato front, we grew four species at the end of winter: yellowish potatoes of Nicola and Vitabella varieties, as well as the red Desiree and Delila types. We have known and loved the Nicola and Desiree for years now, but Vitabella and Delila were brand new to us. Unfortunately, the potato outcome across the board was disappointing this year. The plants were thinner with fewer stems (maybe because the bulbs were smaller than usual) and did not achieve their usual standard. Perhaps the cold and rainy weather (gratefully received – except when growing potatoes) upset the potatoes, some of which developed various leaf diseases (including Bacterial speek), and achieved an overall small yield… In summing up the potato situation, we determined that the problems reflected the location in which they were planted, the small-sized bulbs and seeds and the very rainy season. And yet – we’ll try for better luck next year!

Other innovative ideas where it’s too early to measure success: new species in the fall planting – crimped Winterbor kale and the multicolored Swiss chard that yields dark green leaves in various spine colors: yellow, pinkish, light green. Hopefully you will see for yourselves as we move along this season.

Our annual contemplations have not ended. Tune in for our Post-Sukkot Newsletter where we shall continue, plus regale you with stories of Chubeza’s Winter in the Rain.

In the Yom Kippur spirit, I’d like to reshare something I wrote in the past:

Several years ago, a friend introduced me to the “complementary confession” – an alternative or perhaps supplementary addition to the standard “we have sinned, we have betrayed” Yom Kippur confession which accounts for 22 sins in alphabetical order. The supplementary confession is based on beautiful words by Rav Kook: “as there is great benefit to the healing of one’s soul in confessing sins… this holds  true also towards confessions of good deeds which will gladden one’s heart and strengthen his/her good ways.”

In the complementary confession written by Rav Benjamin Holzman, the Rabbi of Kibbutz Ma’ale Gilboa, each Hebrew letter receives a word of a positive nature, referring to life and deeds. And he is not the only one. Professor Vered Noam, a scholar and Talmud teacher, wrote a confession for adults which not only berates oneself for sinning, but also contains compassion, acceptance and humane, healthy self- observation. Reading these beautiful confessions inspired me to write a Chubeza confession by aleph-bet. So it’s not as well-phrased and refined, more like a salad of thoughts and emotions, as is appropriate for a farmer…

Anyway, here goes:

We have loved the land

Chosen seeds and plants

We trimmed

And thinned out

We smelled the scent of rain

Made sure the earth was moist

We seeded

Furrowed

Tasted

Sat down to take a rest

Bent our backs

Learned to cope (or to accept)

life with a new harmful pest…

We sorted out the produce

Wiped our brows

Told you the vegetables’ tales

Answered questions like “what is this petrified corn”?

We weeded, and weeded and weeded

and scattered compost

We rejoiced

and harvested

Made lists of veggies in the boxes

Delivered the vegetables to you

And thanked the Lord, the earth, the rain and sun. And we thank you for all your love and support. 

אהבנו את האדמה
בחרנו זרעים ושתילים
גזמנו
דיללנו
הרחנו את הגשם
וידאנו שהאדמה לחה דיה
זרענו
חרצנו תלם
טעמנו
ישבנו לנוח
כפפנו גו
למדנו איך להתמודד (ולפעמים להשלים) עם מזיק חדש
מיינו את התוצרת
ניגבנו זיעה
סיפרנו לכם על הירקות
ענינו לשאלות “מה זה התירס הקשה הזה”

עישבנו עישבנו עישבנו
פיזרנו קומפוסט
צחקנו
קטפנו
רשמנו רשימת ירקות בארגז
שלחנו אליכם ירקות
תודות לאל, לאדמה, למטר ולחמה, ותודה לכם, על התמיכה והאהבה.

And just before we part, we happily send congratulations to Saffa and Majdi on the birth of their second daughter, sister to Salame, niece to delighted uncle Ali and of course, granddaughter of the very proud grandpa Mohammed. A hearty mazal tov from all of us!

Wishing you all a good year. May you be inscribed in the Book of Life!

Alon, Bat Ami, Dror, Orin, Yochai and the entire Chubeza team

___________________________________________

WHAT’S IN THIS WEEK’S BOXES?

There’s an abundance of vegetables at Chubeza, so this week you’ll be receiving 12-15 vegetables, including a bundle of delectable greens as our gift!

B’teavon and labriut!

Monday: Red bell peppers, sweet potatoes, eggplant/potatoes, cucumbers, cherry tomatoes/tomatoes, lubia Thai yard-long beans, slice of pumpkin, parsley/coriander/dill, lettuce, New Zealand spinach, Swiss chard. Special gift: mizuna/arugula/tot soi

Large box, in addition: Corn/baby radishes/beets, Iraqi lubia/okra, leeks.

FRUIT BOXES: Bananas, pomegranates, yellow delicious apples. Small boxes, in addition: Kubo (cactus fruit). Large boxes, in addition: Pomelit, kiwi

Thursday: Red bell peppers, sweet potatoes, eggplant, cucumbers, tomatoes, lubia Thai yard-long beans, slice of pumpkin, parsley/dill, New Zealand spinach/tot soi, mizuna/arugula/lettuce, Swiss chard. Special gift: coriander.

Large box, in addition: Baby radishes/beets/potatoes, Iraqi lubia/okra, leeks.

FRUIT BOXES: Pomegranates, apples, Kubo (cactus fruit). Small boxes, in addition: Bananas. Large boxes, in addition: Kiwi.

October 3rd 2019 – Welcome New Year 5780

NEW YEARS 5780 – CHANGES IN CHUBEZA DELIVERY SCHEDULES:

THIS WEEK OF ROSH HASHANAH:

  • No Monday deliveries (We are unable to deliver a vegetable box this week to some of you.)

Deliveries to Rechovot, Nez Tziona, Rishon Lezion, Mazkeret Batya, Gush Etzion, Jerusalem, Kfar Bin Nun and in certain neighborhoods in Tel Aviv moved to Thursday October 3. An email message as well as SMS message was sent to all those whose Monday delivery is today, Thursday.

  • Wednesday deliveries will take place on Thursday October 3.

DURING THE WEEK OF YOM KIPPUR:

  • Monday deliveries as usual on October 7.
  • Wednesday deliveries will take place on Thursday October 10.

DURING THE WEEK OF CHIL HAMOED SUKKOT, THERE WILL BE NO DELIVERIES, i.e. no deliveries on Monday October 14 or Wednesday October 16.

DURING THE WEEK OF SIMCHAT TORAH:

  • The Monday delivery will be transferred to Tuesday October 22.
  • Wednesday delivery (October 23) will take place as usual.

DURING THE WEEK FOLLOWING SUKKOT AND SIMCHAT TORAH, ROUTINE DELIVERY RETURNS!

Those who wish to increase the size and/or contents of your pre-holiday box, please inform us as soon as possible.

OPEN DAY:

In keeping with our twice-yearly tradition, we invite you for a Chol HaMoed “pilgrimage” to Chubeza’s field to celebrate our Open Day.
This year’s festive Sukkot Open Day will take place on Thursday, October 17, the 18th of Tishrei (third day of Chol HaMoed) from 12:00 noon – 5:00 PM.

The Open Day gives us a chance to meet, tour the field, and nosh on vegetables and other delicacies. Children have their own tailor-made tours designed for little feet and curious minds, plus special activities and a vast space to run around and loosen up. (Open to adults as well…)

Driving instructions are on our website under “Contact Us.” Please make sure you check this before heading our way.

Chag Sameach and Shana Tova to all of you from all of us. We look forward to seeing you all!

___________________________________

Over the upcoming holiday season, Ish Shel Lechem can only provide bread loaves for the Monday, Oct. 7th deliveries. (No bread will be baked on October 3rd or 7th.) Cookies and crackers are available and may be ordered at any time.

Ido and Carole will resume their regular baking schedule immediately after Sukkot and Simchat Torah.

Happy holidays!

______________________________________

What’s in this Thursday’s box?

Sweet potato, Thai long beans, tomato/cherry tomatoes, potato/eggplants, corn, slice of pumpkin, parsley/cilantro/dill, lettuce, cucumber, New Zealand spinach/Swiss chard, tatsoi/mizuna/arugula.

Large box also: leek, okra/Iraqi lubia, red bell peppers.

Fruit box: Apples, mango, kiwi, pomelo.

September 23rd-25th 2019 – Shana Tova!

NEW YEARS 5780 – CHANGES IN CHUBEZA DELIVERY SCHEDULES:

THIS WEEK OF ROSH HASHANAH:

  • No Monday deliveries (We will be unable to deliver a vegetable box this week to some of you.)

Deliveries to Rechovot, Nez Tziona, Rishon Lezion, Mazkeret Batya, Gush Etzion, Jerusalem, Kfar Bin Nun and in certain neighborhoods in Tel Aviv will be moved to Thursday October 3. An email message as well as SMS message will be sent to all those whose Monday delivery will be transferred to Thursday during that week.

  • Wednesday deliveries will take place on Thursday October 3.

DURING THE WEEK OF YOM KIPPUR:

  • Monday deliveries as usual on October 7.
  • Wednesday deliveries will take place on Thursday October 10.

DURING THE WEEK OF CHIL HAMOED SUKKOT, THERE WILL BE NO DELIVERIES, i.e. no deliveries on Monday October 14 or Wednesday October 16.

DURING THE WEEK OF SIMCHAT TORAH:

  • The Monday delivery will be transferred to Tuesday October 22.
  • Wednesday delivery (October 23) will take place as usual.

DURING THE WEEK FOLLOWING SUKKOT AND SIMCHAT TORAH, ROUTINE DELIVERY RETURNS!

Those who wish to increase the size and/or contents of your pre-holiday box, please inform us as soon as possible.

OPEN DAY:

In keeping with our twice-yearly tradition, we invite you for a Chol HaMoed “pilgrimage” to Chubeza’s field to celebrate our Open Day.
This year’s festive Sukkot Open Day will take place on Thursday, October 17, the 18th of Tishrei (third day of Chol HaMoed) from 12:00 noon – 5:00 PM.

The Open Day gives us a chance to meet, tour the field, and nosh on vegetables and other delicacies. Children have their own tailor-made tours designed for little feet and curious minds, plus special activities and a vast space to run around and loosen up. (Open to adults as well…)

Driving instructions are on our website under “Contact Us.” Please make sure you check this before heading our way.

Chag Sameach and Shana Tova to all of you from all of us. We look forward to seeing you all!

___________________________________

Over the upcoming holiday season, Ish Shel Lechem can only provide bread loaves for the Monday, Oct. 7th deliveries. (No bread will be baked on October 3rd or 7th.) Cookies and crackers are available and may be ordered at any time.

Ido and Carole will resume their regular baking schedule immediately after Sukkot and Simchat Torah.

Happy holidays!

______________________________________

Each year the grass grows green
The squills go white, the citrus gold
Every year the earth renews
The sun comes up, the rain falls cold
Each year so many new are born
To happiness and grief, to laughter and to tear
And someone who wants only good to prevail
…this year.

–       Leah Goldberg
(translation: A. Raz)

In several days we will bid farewell to 5779 as 5780 gently breezes in. Many eager, holiday-dressed families will assume their places at festive tables to celebrate the new year together. In Jewish tradition, there are in fact four new years, or rather various dates over the four seasons which are each considered New Year’s, as detailed in Tractate Rosh HaShanah: 


On the first of Nisan, the new year for the kings and for the festivals;
On the first of Elul, the new year for the tithing of animals;
Rabbi Eliezer and Rabbi Shimon say, on the first of Tishrei
On the first of Tishrei, the new year for years, for the Sabbatical years and for the Jubilee years and for the planting and for the vegetables
On the first of Shvat, the new year for the trees, these are the words of the House of Shammai;
The House of Hillel says, on the fifteenth thereof

The month of Nisan marks the beginning of the holiday cycle, and the years of royal reign are counted from the first of Nisan. The month of Elul is when animals (especially sheep herds) are tallied; Shvat is the date that counts for growers of orchards and groves, and Tishrei is our very own Rosh HaShana – for the farmers growing vegetables in the fields. The perfect logic of this timing is something we actually can feel. Our bodies which sweltered over the long, exhausting summer days are softening and cooling down a bit, basking in the lower temperatures and earlier sunsets. Autumn is when the field completes its annual cycle: summer yields are ending, and autumn plants have already acclimated in the field to await the first showers and new beginnings. Chaperoning these winds of change are hopes and wishes for a blessed, fruitful and rainy year.

These hopes are tangibly expressed in the blessings and symbols of the holiday. The Talmudic sage Abaye, who was probably in charge of the Holiday Food Column, is the one who invented the symbolic dishes for the Talmudic table. In Tractate Krittut 6, 1: “Said Abaye: Now that you have mentioned that the siman has significance, every Rosh Hashanah, one should eat a pumpkin, black-eyed peas, leeks, beet greens and dates.” In a different place, someone on a major diet must have edited him and decided that one could only feast his eyes on the holiday table. In Tractate Horayot 12, 1: “Everyone should look at them.”

I like the holiday symbols, not necessarily because of their blessings (I can definitely do without all the curses and abuse to our enemies. Not my idea of an optimistic holiday atmosphere…), but because of the seasonal variation that the holiday table offers, bringing together guests of all sorts: from the green leaves (Swiss chard), the legumes (black-eyed lubia peas), the princess of onions (leek) and the gourds, the summer kings. Plus, of course, the pomegranate and dates, apples, honey and fish – all showcasing the bounty this blessed land naturally provides each season.

And as we sit at the festive table and think about the passing year (what we resolve to discontinue) and look forward to the new year (and what we hope it will bring), the seasonal meal suggests we linger in the present, eat something that is in fact here and now, being harvested in our fields as we speak. And together with what was and what will be, to experience that which is presently on the tip of our tongues and taste buds, crunching in our mouths, and smacking our lips in pleasure.

May our year be blessed!

And keeping with the ancient Chubeza tradition – our very own blessings for our Chubeza vegetable symbols.

Lettuce: Lettuce learn to accept the changes that even the known, accepted rituals undergo in hue, texture and flavor. Lettuce know to appreciate and not take for granted the loyalty of those who remain with us, now and forever.

New Zealand Spinach: May we acknowledge our strengths to survive and flourish in green freshness, even when the heat is on.

Silka (beet greens, Swiss chard): May we beet off self-doubt and undermining criticism, and may we cultivate a confident, strong, supportive spine as oh-so-stately as the chard’s.

Salad Green Assortment: May we learn to enjoy the variety, differences and vibrant diversity of everyone in this country.

Pumpkin: May we persevere, as the pumpkin, to the end of the vine.

Potato: May we learn from mistakes made in the past, of others and of our own. May we remember to vary our fields with many yields, and not only count on the simplest and most common (you can find an explanation right here).

Sweet Potato: May we enjoy sweet surprises that grew and ripened far from the naked eye, and may they bring with them wholeness and happiness.

Leek: May we have the patience to grow slowly and diligently, and the understanding that sometimes, in order to reach ripeness, one must grow very slowly. And spring no leeks.

Eggplant: May we try and succeed to see the light, whiteness and faint but beautiful purple hue within the murky dark.

Pepper: May we be blessed with the skill to pepper our speech with just the right phrases, without overdoing it. And when life gets salty, may we stand beside it to add some spice.

Cucumber: When others are in a dither, may we develop the sensitivity and ability to be calm, levelheaded and cool, as the cucumber.

Tomato: May our experiences be homegrown, ripened on the vine, full of juice, color and sweetness.

Coriander: May we rejoice in the difference in people’s tastes, in the differences between us, in the wonderful variety and vibrancy that create a symphony of opinions, varying faces and opposite choices.

Parsley: May we allow the good things to enter, fill and cleanse us from the poisonous and harmful. And may we live sparsely, as the parsley.

Dill: May our year be characterized by diligent work and solvable dilemmas.

Okra: May we gaze at the stars at least one night every-so-often to feel the lightness of our minuteness and the strength of being part of the vast cosmos. (slice the okra horizontally to see stars)

Black-eyed Pea (lubia)May our shiners be only from this pea.

Corn: May we have a bright, sweet and delicious year! (You heard it ear first….)

Mallow: This September, may we try to remember when life was sweet and oh, so mallow. Renew our days, as of old!

So here’s to the New Year, to great expectations and very wet showers — please, oh please, may they come in due time, in the proper measure. May they satiate the human salad of this country, and the animals crying out for drink, the dusty plants growing grey at the edges, the flying insects, the crawlers and jumpers, the rocks and clods of earth that so crave the blessing of rain.

And, beyond the rain, we wish you the fulfillment of your hopes and prayers, for good and for blessing, for happiness and growth. Shana Tova!

From the entire Chubeza crew in the field, the packing house, the office and on the roads: Alon, Bat Ami, Dror, Orin, Yochai, Mohammed, Majdi, Ali, Vinay, Thom, Hott, Montray, Assaf, Yuval, Daphna, Melissa, Ruthie, Alon, Eyal, David, Alon, Ziv, David, Melanie, Aliza.

________________________________

WHAT’S IN THIS WEEK’S HOLIDAY BOXES?

Monday: Potatoes, sweet potatoes, eggplant, cucumbers, cherry tomatoes/ tomatoes, lubia Thai yard-long beans/Iraqi lubia, slice of pumpkin, parsley/coriander/dill, lettuce, leeks. Small boxes only: corn.

Large box, in addition: Okra, New Zealand spinach/Swiss chard, bell peppers, baby salad greens

FRUIT BOXES: Pomegranates, mango, apples, bananas. Large boxes:  Kubo (cactus fruit)

Wednesday: Sweet potatoes, cucumbers, New Zealand spinach/Swiss chard, cherry tomatoes/ tomatoes, lubia Thai yard-long beans, slice of pumpkin, parsley/coriander/dill, lettuce, bell peppers, corn. Small boxes only: baby salad greens.

Large box, in addition: Potatoes, okra/Iraqi lubia, leeks, eggplant.

FRUIT BOXES: Pomegranates, mango, apples, bananas. Large boxes:  Kubo (cactus fruit).

September 16th-18th 2019 – How sweet it is to be loved by you…

NEW YEARS 5780 – CHANGES IN CHUBEZA DELIVERY SCHEDULES:

DURING THE WEEK OF ROSH HASHANAH:

  • There will be no Monday deliveries (We will be unable to deliver a vegetable box this week to some of you.)

Deliveries to Rechovot, Nez Tziona, Rishon Lezion, Mazkeret Batya, Gush Etzion, Jerusalem, Kfar Bin Nun and in certain neighborhoods in Tel Aviv will be moved to Thursday October 3. An email message as well as SMS message will be sent to all those whose Monday delivery will be transferred to Thursday during that week.

  • Wednesday deliveries will take place on Thursday October 3.

DURING THE WEEK OF YOM KIPPUR:

  • Monday deliveries as usual on October 7.
  • Wednesday deliveries will take place on Thursday October 10.

DURING THE WEEK OF CHIL HAMOED SUKKOT, THERE WILL BE NO DELIVERIES, i.e. no deliveries on Monday October 14 or Wednesday October 16.

DURING THE WEEK OF SIMCHAT TORAH:

  • The Monday delivery will be transferred to Tuesday October 22.
  • Wednesday delivery (October 23) will take place as usual.

DURING THE WEEK FOLLOWING SUKKOT AND SIMCHAT TORAH, ROUTINE DELIVERY RETURNS!

Those who wish to increase the size and/or contents of your pre-holiday box, please inform us as soon as possible.

OPEN DAY:

In keeping with our twice-yearly tradition, we invite you for a Chol HaMoed “pilgrimage” to Chubeza’s field to celebrate our Open Day.
This year’s festive Sukkot Open Day will take place on Thursday, October 17, the 18th of Tishrei (third day of Chol HaMoed) from 12:00 noon – 5:00 PM.

The Open Day gives us a chance to meet, tour the field, and nosh on vegetables and other delicacies. Children have their own tailor-made tours designed for little feet and curious minds, plus special activities and a vast space to run around and loosen up. (Open to adults as well…)

Driving instructions are on our website under “Contact Us.” Please make sure you check this before heading our way.

Chag Sameach and Shana Tova to all of you from all of us. We look forward to seeing you all!

In the spirit of the upcoming New Year, here’s some great new offers from our associates:

  • Ilana and Davidi have released the English version of their amazing “Shana Bagina” Calendar-Farmer’s Almanac. From this week, you can order it from the Chubeza Order System!
  • Didi and Shira, producers of prize-winning “Tene Yarok” olive oil from Rotem, are offering a very special sale on their entire line of oil. Each variety is now available at the reduced price of 46 NIS per bottle! And – you may now purchase their high-quality oil in 2 and 4-liter cans.
  • Kibbutz Naot Smadar has developed new additional flavors for their delectable, healthy (and we mean healthy…) snacks: date with cocoa beans and date with goji berries! Order single packages to sample these delicacies. And, their incredible olives are now available in small 180 ml. jars that make perfect holiday gifts to delight the heart and the palate!

All of these products and a treasure of distinctive others as well are available for purchase and delivery in your boxes via the Chubeza Order System.

_______________________________________________________

Ain’t She Sweet?!

Though she’s frequented our boxes for several weeks now, she actually started out with us four months ago (perhaps more). For our part, we’ve been at her side observing the various stages of her growth and snapping shots for her fashion model portfolio. So, this week’s Newsletter is devoted to giving you a glossy look at our glamorous redheaded friend – the sweet potato (aka yam).

Growing sweet potatoes is a lesson in faith, imagination and hope. This is how it works:

In the beginning of May we received a package from Oded of Moshav Yesha, which we opened to find this treasure:

“Well, hey there, Georgia!” we greeted our sweet potato, and happily placed the cuttings into the pre-dug mounds we’d prepared in the ground, separated from one another by 15 centimeters. Here’s how it looked like when we were done:

And close up:

A few days later, we started to notice tiny little leaves growing on those branches, and then, lo and behold – this is the scene just one week later:

Remember that naked branch? Look how well dressed she  is now!

Then, the young seedlings begin stretching out their beautiful arms, on their way to a bountiful future:

Only two weeks later, the field looks like a sea of green, with densely assembled leaves, branches and a vibrant, verdant carpet of blooms:

Posing up close:

…and zooming in even closer: look at these gorgeous little flowers, with their characteristic Convolvulaceae family purple hue at the center. The sweet potato is practically the only edible plant in this extended family that includes such decorative and wild plants as the morning glory and the bindweed.

In a neighboring bed, a wild cousin comes to visit (there’s one in every family…), extending his arms and beautiful white flowers which have an intoxicating scent. Take a whiff (and FYI – place them on your nose and inhale. They’ll stick right to it!):

And underneath this green carpet, silently and surely, the sweet potato plant sends out roots which thicken to store within them nutrients for wintertime. Four months after we first began the process, we start checking out what’s happening underground. If needed, we turn off the irrigation, causing the sweet potatoes to grow just a little more, and begin pulling out the luscious orange roots.

Bon appetite to you all! May we enjoy a week of faith, imagination, hope and deliciousness!

Alon, Bat Ami, Dror, Orin, Yochai and the entire Chubeza team

___________________________________________________

WHAT’S IN THIS WEEK’S BOXES?

Monday: Potatoes, red bell peppers, sweet potatoes, eggplant, cucumbers, tomatoes, lubia Thai yard-long beans, slice of pumpkin, lettuce, parsley/coriander. Small boxes only: leeks.

Large box, in addition: Cherry tomatoes, okra/Iraqi lubia, New Zealand spinach/Swiss chard, corn.

FRUIT BOXES: Mango, pomegranates, grapes. Small boxes: Pears. Large boxes: Peaches

Wednesday: Potatoes, red bell peppers, sweet potatoes, eggplant, cucumbers, tomatoes, lubia Thai yard-long beans, slice of pumpkin, lettuce, parsley/coriander. Small boxes only: leeks.

Large box, in addition: Cherry tomatoes, okra/Iraqi lubia, New Zealand spinach/Swiss chard, corn.

FRUIT BOXES: Mango, pomegranates, grapes. Small boxes: Bananas. Large boxes: Kubo

September 9th-11th 2019

This week we do not send a newsletter. Enjoy your veggies, and see you next week!

What’s in this week’s boxes?

Monday: Potatoes, butternut squash/sweet potatoes, eggplant, cucumbers, tomatoes, Iraqi lubia/Thai yard-long lubia, slice of pumpkin, parsley/coriander, New Zealand spinach/Swiss chard/lettuce, cherry tomatoes, corn.

Large box, in addition: Onions/leeks, , okra, peppers.

Fruit box: Mango, plums, pomegranates, bananas. Large boxes, in addition: Apples

Wednesday: Potatoes, butternut squash/eggplant, okra/sweet potatoes, cucumbers, tomatoes, Thai yard-long lubia/Iraqi lubia, slice of pumpkin, parsley/coriander, New Zealand spinach/Swiss chard, red bell bell peppers, corn.

Large box, in addition: Leeks, lettuce, cherry tomatoes.

Fruit box: Mango, plums, pomegranates. Small boxes, in addition: Apples. Large boxes, in addition: Grapes.